Show simple item record

dc.contributor.supervisor King, Regine (Social Work) en_US
dc.contributor.author Eidse, Joy
dc.date.accessioned 2018-09-17T18:23:25Z
dc.date.available 2018-09-17T18:23:25Z
dc.date.issued 2018 en_US
dc.date.submitted 2018-09-17T02:54:43Z en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/33413
dc.description.abstract This study was developed on the premise that lack of white racial identity awareness is a contributor to the experience of racism in the social services by Indigenous people. It sought to increase racial identity awareness among social workers who identified as white. This study was a process evaluation intended to discover if individuals felt that their racial identity awareness had changed after participating in the study. Nine social workers were interviewed before and after an intervention, in which they spent two hours a week, for eight weeks, in a narrative working group examining whiteness. Data was analyzed using dialogical/performative analysis examined through the lens of critical whiteness theory, and an Indigenous framework. The findings indicated that participants felt an increase in their ability to talk about whiteness and more confidence in addressing racism in their lives and workplaces after participating in this study. en_US
dc.subject racism en_US
dc.subject whiteness en_US
dc.subject narrative en_US
dc.subject Social work en_US
dc.subject critical theory en_US
dc.title Increasing awareness of racial identity among white social workers - a narrative approach en_US
dc.degree.discipline Social Work en_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Hart, Michael (Social Work) Wilkinson, Lori (Sociology) en_US
dc.degree.level Master of Social Work (M.S.W.) en_US
dc.description.note October 2018 en_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

View Statistics