Manitoba Heritage Theses

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Contains full text Manitoba-related theses dating from 1902 to the present.

The University of Manitoba Libraries gratefully acknowledges the financial support of the Manitoba Department of Heritage, Culture, Tourism and Sport in the digitization of many of these theses.

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Now showing 1 - 5 of 6302
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    Pre-treatment and extraction techniques for improving the recovery of canolol and related phenolics in mustard and canola co-products
    (2024-02-16) Fadairo, Olamide; House, James (Food and Human Nutritional Sciences); Rempel, Curtis (Food and Human Nutritional Sciences); Aluko, Rotimi (Food and Human Nutritional Sciences); Tsopmo, Apollinaire (Carleton University); Scanlon, Martin; Eskin, Michael
    The objectives of the thesis were to study convective heating (air frying) for improving the extraction of phenolics from mustard and canola co-products, and to assess how micro-emulsion (ME) and supercritical CO2 (SC-CO2) processing techniques affect phenolics contents in canola co-products. Mustard and canola seeds were air-fried at temperature-time combinations of 160, 170, 180, or 190 °C for 5, 10, 15 or 20 min. Oil was extracted using the Soxhlet method and the de-oiled meal was air-dried at room temperature. Oil-soluble phenolics were extracted from the oil by hexane/70% methanol mixture, while meal-derived phenolics were isolated using ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) with 70% (v/v) methanol. Phenolics were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD). The antioxidant potential of both the oil and defatted meal extracts was evaluated using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), and metal ion-chelation (MIC) assays. The extraction of major oil-soluble and meal-derived phenolics in all the mustard and canola co-products showed a temperature-time dependency. The highest canolol content in the oil was obtained after air frying the seeds at 170 and 190 °C for 15 min, for mustard and canola oil, respectively. Oil extracts from both mustard and canola showed improved antioxidant activities (DPPH and FRAP) but poor MIC. On the other hand, canola meal extracts showed better MIC. Canola press cake (CPC) from two different sources was treated with different SC-CO2 and ME protocols to remove varying levels of oil. The partially de-oiled meals were extracted using UAE-70% (v/v) methanol. The phenolic-rich extracts were analyzed and quantified by HPLC-DAD. The results were compared with phenolic extracts from canola meal de-oiled using standard industrial hexane extraction (HE). ME was effective in sinapine removal, while SC-CO2 showed better TPC values than HE and ME. Also, ME extracts showed better MIC while SC-CO2 extracts exhibited better DPPH and FRAP values. The outcomes of the thesis will contribute to value-added processing strategies for canola and mustard to generate antioxidants and produce functional canola meal proteins with potential applications in the food and agro-allied industries.
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    The application of composting for phosphorous recovery from alum and ferric precipitated sludges
    (2024-04-28) Vahedi, Saba; Chen, Ying (Biosystems Engineering); Lozecznik, Stan (Civil Engineering); Yuan, Qiuyan
    In this study, the recovery of phosphorous (P) from sludge produced during phosphorous removal from secondary wastewater lagoons by using a controlled composting process was investigated. Two compost piles, one using Alum (Al) and the other Ferric (Fe) precipitated sludge, were established. Sludge was mixed with dry woodchips (1:3 ratio), manually turned weekly, and monitored for temperature, moisture, and pH, every two days. After an eight-week thermophilic phase and six-week maturity phase, compost met Category A criteria per CCME guidelines. The compost products were tested on switchgrass and canola to assess phosphorus availability, with control experiments using topsoil and Monoammonium Phosphate (MAP) fertilizer. Three cropping cycles, each lasting 50 days, were completed, and analysis of harvested biomass for total phosphorus content using the Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) method was conducted. The analysis of the data showed that the phosphorus source with the greatest P uptake and biomass yield for switchgrass was Ferric Compost. Across different growth cycles, P uptake increased for all phosphorus sources, indicating a gradual release of P from composted chemical sludge over time through mineralization. In terms of canola, Fe compost was the most effective phosphorus source in promoting P uptake. P uptake increased steadily throughout growth cycles when cultivating canola with MAP. However, P uptake decreased with Al compost and Fe compost as growth cycles progressed. Regarding canola, among the three phosphorus sources, Al Compost resulted in the highest biomass yield for all phosphorus sources, while biomass yield decreased as growth cycles progressed. Overall, Fe compost proved most effective for P uptake and biomass yield in switchgrass, while Al compost showed better results for canola. Furthermore, the evaluation of phosphorus recovery efficiency (PRE %) underscored the fluctuating nature of phosphorus retention in both switchgrass and canola
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    Open Access
    Exploring the lived experiences of Indigenous grandmothers raising grandchildren in the Kinship Care Program of the child welfare system: digital storytelling rooted in an Indigenous research paradigm
    (2024-04-08) Nicolas, Suzanne; Martin, Donna (Nursing); Bennett, Marlyn (Social Work); Gifford, Wendy (University of Ottawa); Wilson, Mary (Indigenous Elder, Spiritual Guide); West, Christina
    A growing number of Indigenous grandmothers care for their grandchildren in the Indigenous Child and Family Services (CFS) Authorities in Manitoba, Canada. These grandmothers often face complex issues in addition to being economically and socially disadvantaged. This study explored the lived experiences of grandmothers raising their grandchildren within the Kinship Care Program of the Indigenous CFS Authorities. The objectives of the study were: (1) to understand the lived experiences of Indigenous grandmothers raising their grandchildren, (2) to uncover if, how, and to what extent CFS contributes to grandmothers’ health and well-being, and (3) to explore grandmothers’ perspectives on how they might want to be involved in CFS policy and practice changes and in CFS governance. The Two-Eyed Seeing conceptual model embedded in an Indigenous research paradigm, and storytelling as methodology, combined with digital storytelling as method, facilitated the authentic engagement of grandmothers. Recruitment of knowledge holders/Indigenous grandmothers was challenging, with two Indigenous grandmothers participating in the study. Both knowledge holders created a digital story and shared their digital story in a follow up semi-structured interview and in a talking circle, contributing over 80 hours to the study. Two Indigenous key informants volunteered to participate in an individual one-hour semi-structured interview, viewed the digital stories, and participated in the talking circle with 5 to 6 hours of engagement each. The prioritization of Indigenous grandmothers’ situated knowledge and the meaning-making process gave way to surprising and disturbing findings. It became apparent that there was a collective and powerful story in the unspoken stories; the omnipotent fear of the child welfare system, reliving the past and present traumas of colonization, and fear of exploitation and harm was at the forefront, as well as the ongoing disempowerment of Indigenous grandmothers. Notwithstanding, Indigenous grandmothers/participants demonstrated resiliency, empowerment, and hope as they reclaimed Indigenous womanhood. This study highlights the urgent need for the involvement of Indigenous grandmothers at the helm of CFS governance, policy, and practice changes.
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    Open Access
    The impact of Sanctuary City Policies on healthcare access for immigrants in Winnipeg
    (2024-03-14) Andrade, Evandro; Derejko, Nathan (Law); Khoday, Amar
    This study examines the impact of Sanctuary City Policies (SCPs) on healthcare access for immigrants with precarious status in Winnipeg, focusing on undocumented immigrants, asylum-seekers, and those awaiting legal status determination. It delves into the challenges these individuals face in accessing healthcare due to legal barriers, insurance availability, and fear of deportation, intensified by their heightened health risks and inequities, especially during crises like the COVID-19 pandemic. The paper analyzes Canada's health rights framework, including international obligations under the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR) and the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees, as well as Winnipeg's Newcomer Welcome and Inclusion Policy (NWIP) and different SCPs experiences both abroad and in Canada. It argues that Canada's SCPs, while aiming to protect undocumented immigrants, fall short of fully addressing the obligations outlined in international treaties, leading to disparities in healthcare access. This research integrates international human rights law, international refugee law, and public policy to propose a more inclusive and effective healthcare strategy for immigrants with precarious status, emphasizing the need for a unified approach that overcomes the legal and jurisdictional complexities of Canada's decentralized healthcare system.
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    New leaf rehab centre, salutogenic approach to rehabilitation, improving health in rehab facilities through the lens of salutogenic design
    (2024-03-27) Elyasi, Sima; Roshko, Tijen (Interior Design); Macdonald, Laura (College of Dentistry); Espersen-Peters, Kurt
    Dependence and addiction to substances are chronic diseases and major health issues worldwide. Prolonged substance use can cause irreversible damage to both physical and mental health and can even lead to death. Despite advancements in medical treatment for chronic disease, individuals struggling with addiction may still be at risk of relapse due to a lack of a supportive environment. This practicum examines the application of salutogenic theory in interior design, focusing on a rehabilitation centre for substance use. The salutogenic concept, rooted in Aaron Antonovsky's work, emphasizes the promotion of health and well-being rather than the mere absence of disease. In the challenging environment of substance use rehabilitation, where the journey to recovery is both physical and psychological, the significance of recovery and a supportive interior environment cannot be overstated. The study explores the fundamental principles of salutogenic design to create spaces that promote a sense of coherence for individuals receiving treatment. The purpose is to develop a framework to integrate salutogenic concepts into interior design practice. Key components of the proposed framework include the use of natural surroundings, the promotion of sensory engagement, the establishment of privacy and communal spaces, and the incorporation of therapeutic design elements. This project seeks to establish evidence-based design guidelines to enhance the healing process for substance use within rehabilitation centres through a synthesis of literature review, case studies, and site analysis.