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dc.contributor.author Nordland, Lori Rae Podolsky en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2009-12-08T18:56:49Z
dc.date.available 2009-12-08T18:56:49Z
dc.date.issued 2002-08-01-01:09T00:00:00Z en_US
dc.identifier (Sirsi) APL-5575 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/3764
dc.description.abstract The Plains Cree, Assiniboine and Ojibwa of the Brandon House area were afflicted by the 1819-20 measles epidemic. Each group experienced different mortality rates as a result of differences in their coping strategies. This study examines the various mortality rates through factors such as nutritional intake, suitable housing and overall health. It then attempts to apply the Human Behaviour Model, as developed by Michael Trimble, to the situation at Brandon House and look for anomalies in his model. Finally, this thesis seeks to take a holistic approach in understanding the interrelationship between the local and global events occurring in the early part of the 1800s, as well as the political, social and economic changes experienced by the First Nations peoples. At this time, these people experienced sociocultural and economic changes that both impacted and were impacted by the 1819-20 measles epidemic. In examining the diffusion of the 1819-20 measles epidemic, Michael Trimble's model is based upon the Mandan-Hidatsa horticultural community. While some aspects of his model are applicable to the hunting-based economy of the First Nations people at Brandon House, socioeconomic factors including alcohol consumption are neglected. In addition, a more in-depth analysis of nutritional intake (diet) and social and mental health illuminate the importance of these factors on the immune system and their impact on mortality rates. As nutritional deficiency increases and health decreases, the immune system becomes compromised and a person becomes more susceptible to disease and secondary infections. As the Plains Cree and Assiniboine experienced a decline in their role as middlemen in the fur trade, they began to lose their economic and political position with the Mandan First Nations. Within the historical fur trade literature, political and socioeconomic events such as the "Horse Wars" appear to be removed from the affects of the disease, this is not always the case. Thus, the consequences of the 1819-20 measles epidemic were influenced by human behaviour since the cultural responses to disease are as important as the epidemiological factors. en_US
dc.format.extent v [i.e. vii], 122 leaves : en_US
dc.format.extent 6314109 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language null en_US
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.rights The reproduction of this thesis has been made available by authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research, and may only be reproduced and copied as permitted by copyright laws or with express written authorization from the copyright owner. en_US
dc.title The 1819-20 measles epidemic : its sociocultural and economic consequences in the Brandon House area en_US
dc.degree.discipline Native Studies en_US
dc.degree.level Master of Arts (M.A.) en_US


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