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dc.contributor.supervisor Mason, Gregory (Economics) Mann, Janelle (Economics) en_US
dc.contributor.author Rodriguez Llorian, Elisabet
dc.date.accessioned 2020-06-02T14:06:50Z
dc.date.available 2020-06-02T14:06:50Z
dc.date.copyright 2020-05-28
dc.date.issued 2020 en_US
dc.date.submitted 2020-05-28T14:37:16Z en_US
dc.identifier.citation APA en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/34706
dc.description.abstract Advances in medical technology have changed the standards of models of care, while also constituting a driving force in raising costs. This thesis addresses the various impacts of technology on healthcare through three chapters. The first chapter investigates to what extent medical technology drives healthcare expenditure for a panel of Canadian provinces and another of OECD countries. A careful examination of existing technology proxies is conducted, and three new proxies are added to the literature. A novel dynamic common correlated effect approach from the emerging field of panel time series is employed to explore the relationship between healthcare expenditure and technology. As expected, the variables are tied together by a long-run relationship, but the speed of adjustment varies depending on the technology proxy used and the level of aggregation. The second and third chapters study the effect of two forms of health information technology on a variety of healthcare and health outcomes. Specifically, two programs are investigated: telemedicine and electronic medical records (EMR). Both programs take place in the Canadian province of Manitoba. The linkable administrative data housed at the Manitoba Centre for Health Policy was used to create cohorts of users and non-users for each of the programs. The second chapter uses a propensity-weighted regression model to measure the impact of telemedicine on four indicators of healthcare use. Results point to increased use of healthcare services for telemedicine users. But for those patients who showed higher intensity of use, telemedicine seems to be a substitute for regular care, and not an addition to it. Finally, the third chapter explores the association, at a primary care level, between use of electronic medical records and quality of care measures. A set of indicators covering preventive care, chronic disease management, and healthcare utilization are investigated through a difference-in-differences approach with patient and time fixed effects, and an estimation strategy that uses the variation in timing of adoption. Results show that patients with diabetes in primary care practices using EMR’s show improved management indicators, while no evidence of changes in preventive care or hospitalizations for a set of ambulatory care sensitive conditions is found. en_US
dc.rights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.subject Technology en_US
dc.subject Healthcare en_US
dc.subject Telemedicine en_US
dc.subject Healthcare expenditure en_US
dc.subject Electronic medical records en_US
dc.title Three essays on technology and healthcare en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/doctoralThesis
dc.degree.discipline Economics en_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Katz, Alan (Community Health Sciences) en_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Oguzoglu, Umut (Economics) en_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Grignon, Michel (McMaster University) en_US
dc.degree.level Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) en_US
dc.description.note October 2020 en_US


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