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dc.contributor.supervisor Sevenhuysen,Gustaaf (Human Nutritional Sciences) en_US
dc.contributor.author Kheir, Rzaz
dc.date.accessioned 2014-04-10T16:16:34Z
dc.date.available 2014-04-10T16:16:34Z
dc.date.issued 2014-04-10
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/23433
dc.description.abstract Background: The foods people choose to eat can determine their health status because inadequate or excessive amounts of certain food components are associated with risk of disease. A number of factors influence the foods people choose and the amounts of these foods, such as social situations, habits, advertising and the cost of food (Delormier, et al., 2009). The aim of this study is to identify the perceptions and environmental factors that are associated with food choices and the extent of perceptions to adherence to dietary advice among women with type 2 diabetes. Objectives: 1) To describe food behaviours of women who have diabetes, within their own daily food patterns; 2) To describe the perceptions of women who have diabetes about their social, economic and environmental situations that influence their food choice;, and 3) To identify the perceptions that are associated with the intent or ability to adhere to recommended health and nutrition behaviours. Methodology: Semi-structural individual interviews were used to collect data from 20 women with type 2 diabetes. The Food Choice Map was used to generate the food patterns and food perceptions, Interviews were recorded and transcripts were analyzed by using principles of the Theory of Planned Behavior, constant comparison method to extract themes, and coded by Nvivo software. In addition, the women completed a demographic questionnaire. Results: Of the major factors that the women perceived as influencing their food behaviours, four major factors enabled women to follow nutritional advice, while three factors acted as barriers to following the advice. Groups of women were identified: those who wanted to follow advice and did, those who did not want to follow advice and did not, those who wanted to follow advice but could not, and those who wanted to follow advice but experienced psychological conflict in doing so. Conclusion: Results showed that food behaviours could be better understood through multi-dimensional factors. The four groups of women with diabetes according to perceived intent or ability to adhere to health and nutrition advice was possible in this study, but further studies are needed to justify the use of these groupings in interventions that enhance adherence to dietary advice in the context of type 2 diabetes. Background: The foods people choose to eat can determine their health status because inadequate or excessive amounts of certain food components are associated with risk of disease. A number of factors influence the foods people choose and the amounts of these foods, such as social situations, habits, advertising and the cost of food (Delormier, et al., 2009). The aim of this study is to identify the perceptions and environmental factors that are associated with food choices and the extent of perceptions to adherence to dietary advice among women with type 2 diabetes. Objectives: 1) To describe food behaviours of women who have diabetes, within their own daily food patterns; 2) To describe the perceptions of women who have diabetes about their social, economic and environmental situations that influence their food choice;, and 3) To identify the perceptions that are associated with the intent or ability to adhere to recommended health and nutrition behaviours. Methodology: Semi-structural individual interviews were used to collect data from 20 women with type 2 diabetes. The Food Choice Map was used to generate the food patterns and food perceptions, Interviews were recorded and transcripts were analyzed by using principles of the Theory of Planned Behavior, constant comparison method to extract themes, and coded by Nvivo software. In addition, the women completed a demographic questionnaire. Results: Of the major factors that the women perceived as influencing their food behaviours, four major factors enabled women to follow nutritional advice, while three factors acted as barriers to following the advice. Groups of women were identified: those who wanted to follow advice and did, those who did not want to follow advice and did not, those who wanted to follow advice but could not, and those who wanted to follow advice but experienced psychological conflict in doing so. Conclusion: Results showed that food behaviours could be better understood through multi-dimensional factors. The four groups of women with diabetes according to perceived intent or ability to adhere to health and nutrition advice was possible in this study, but further studies are needed to justify the use of these groupings in interventions that enhance adherence to dietary advice in the context of type 2 diabetes. en_US
dc.subject Food choice en_US
dc.subject Adherence en_US
dc.title Understanding perceptions of adherence to dietary advice among women with type 2 diabetes en_US
dc.degree.discipline Human Nutritional Sciences en_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Slater, Joyce (Human Nutritional Sciences) Feltham, Tammi (Textile Sciences) en_US
dc.degree.level Master of Science (M.Sc.) en_US
dc.description.note May 2014 en_US


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