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dc.contributor.supervisor Baydack, Rick (Environment and Geography) en_US
dc.contributor.author Moayeri, Michelle
dc.date.accessioned 2013-04-10T20:24:30Z
dc.date.available 2013-04-10T20:24:30Z
dc.date.issued 2013-04-10
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/18725
dc.description.abstract Understanding wolf (Canis lupus) food habits provides critical information for boreal woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou; forest-dwelling ecotype) recovery strategies. By incorporating the stable isotope ratios of different caribou ecotypes into a stable isotope mixing model, I determined the relative importance of boreal woodland caribou in the summer diet of wolves in northern Manitoba, Canada. Boreal woodland caribou were primary summer prey for wolves collected in winter in registered trapline (RTL) districts where these caribou are considered rare, suggesting migratory behaviour in some wolves. Moose were primary prey in other RTL districts, followed by boreal woodland caribou, with beaver providing important contributions. Recovery strategies for woodland caribou should investigate annual wolf, caribou, and moose movement in the region to complement these findings and gain a better insight into this complex ecosystem. en_US
dc.subject wolves en_US
dc.subject stable isotope analysis en_US
dc.subject moose en_US
dc.subject caribou en_US
dc.subject ecology en_US
dc.subject diet en_US
dc.title Reconstructing the Summer Diet of Wolves in a Complex Multi-Ungulate System in Northern Manitoba, Canada en_US
dc.degree.discipline Environment and Geography en_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Walker, David (Environment and Geography) Roth, James (Biological Sciences) en_US
dc.degree.level Master of Science (M.Sc.) en_US
dc.description.note May 2013 en_US


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