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dc.contributor.supervisor Eaton, Marcella (Landscape Architecture) en_US
dc.contributor.author Dilts, Dustin
dc.date.accessioned 2013-09-09T19:30:23Z
dc.date.available 2013-09-09T19:30:23Z
dc.date.issued 2013-09-09
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/22143
dc.description.abstract This body of work began as an exploration of the University of Manitoba’s Southwood Lands (a former eighteen-hole golf course), with the intention of proposing something new for the site. However, analysis and critical thinking led to the realization that there was a need to not only look at the Southwood Lands, but also the entire Fort Garry Campus. The work evolved through a process of discovery, using a variety of methods from walking the site, documentation through photography, visits to the archives to uncover history, and mapping from afar. One of the underlying objectives was to highlight the importance of taking additional time to understand a place prior to making decisions, revealing what makes a place unique, where the opportunities are, and what has been hidden over time. The idea of a site being a blank slate is dismissed, drawing on the importance of found conditions in decision making. Looking deeper into a place also leads to a greater respect for what is already there. It is what we already have that is so often discarded, and seen as having no value in decision making (the natural areas in a city or the trees on a former golf course for example). It is also the ecosystems that are seen as scrubby and unkept that are the most complex systems and richest spaces for life. Once complex, biologically rich systems are erased there is no going back to them. It is the existing conditions that are worth taking the extra time to investigate, a process that must occur prior to making design decisions that seek to remove or make new. It is only though looking, and looking carefully with un-objective eyes, and an open mind, that design can truly enhance what we already have. This practicum works under the premise that landscape has value in its own right. The landscape is not empty space, not just a place to put buildings, not a luxury that can easily be cut from budgets, and certainly not something that can be considered an afterthought. Instead, landscape is valued as something which is working and active, an essential part of life on this planet that is becoming increasingly important with a rapidly changing climate. The intellectual foundation for organizing ideas around approaching the site have been interpreted from Christophe Girot’s ‘Four Trace Concepts in Landscape Architecture’. They are in this order: landing, grounding, finding, and founding. While Girot’s four trace concepts organize ideas around approaching the site, there are three underlying principles that guide the entire body of work: 1. Landscape as infrastructure and organizing system; 2. Design as a process of discovery; 3. Investigation through multiple scales of inquiry. A strategy for the Fort Garry Campus is where this work concludes, followed by reflections on the importance of context in design and the lessons learned throughout the practicum process. en_US
dc.rights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.subject Fort Garry en_US
dc.subject campus en_US
dc.subject Landscape Architecture en_US
dc.subject Southwood en_US
dc.subject Winnipeg en_US
dc.subject Manitoba en_US
dc.subject land en_US
dc.subject landscape en_US
dc.subject design en_US
dc.subject planning en_US
dc.subject strategy en_US
dc.subject ethics en_US
dc.subject Christophe Girot en_US
dc.subject trace concepts en_US
dc.subject urban design en_US
dc.subject history en_US
dc.subject rapid transit en_US
dc.subject Pembina Highway en_US
dc.subject park en_US
dc.subject proximity principle en_US
dc.subject light pollution en_US
dc.subject geology en_US
dc.subject ecosystem services en_US
dc.subject flora en_US
dc.subject fauna en_US
dc.subject plants en_US
dc.subject animals en_US
dc.subject Red River en_US
dc.subject birds en_US
dc.subject land cover en_US
dc.subject analysis en_US
dc.subject Visionary (re)Generation en_US
dc.subject tree cover en_US
dc.subject Anishinaabe en_US
dc.subject ecology en_US
dc.subject sustainability en_US
dc.title Campus landscape en_US
dc.title.alternative Fort Garry Campus - Winnipeg, Manitoba en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/masterThesis
dc.type master thesis en_US
dc.degree.discipline Landscape Architecture en_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Tate, Alan (Landscape Architecture) Olson, Douglas (O2 Planning + Design) en_US
dc.degree.level Master of Landscape Architecture (M.Land.Arch.) en_US
dc.description.note October 2013 en_US


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