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dc.contributor.supervisor Charles (Wuttunee), Wanda (Native Studies) en_US
dc.contributor.author Loustel, Mary Jane
dc.date.accessioned 2011-09-14T22:59:47Z
dc.date.available 2011-09-14T22:59:47Z
dc.date.issued 2011-09-14
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/4924
dc.description.abstract There is an exciting movement afoot in Canada with rapid growth of Aboriginal participation in the economy through business development. Motivated to recover social and economic independence, Aboriginal people are asserting their rights and pressing for self-determination, using various models of development. In this thesis, economic development through the model of privately-owned enterprise is evaluated considering history, Aboriginal values and a female gender perspective. There is a brief highlight of the history of Aboriginal participation in the economy; the analysis focuses on influences which followed the 1969 Federal Government Statement on Indian Policy, known as The White Paper. The research in this thesis demonstrates that through privately-owned enterprise, Aboriginal entrepreneurs can assert Aboriginal values within a capital market system that does not easily accommodate personal held values; and through this assertion Aboriginal entrepreneurs can achieve business success, self-determination and contribute positively to social and economic well-being for Aboriginal peoples. en_US
dc.subject Entrepreneurship en_US
dc.subject Culture en_US
dc.subject Women en_US
dc.title Entrepreneurship: a journey of economic self-determination en_US
dc.degree.discipline Native Studies en_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Eigenbrod, Renate (Native Studies) Piquemal, Nathalie (Educational Administration, Foundations and Psychology) en_US
dc.degree.level Master of Arts (M.A.) en_US
dc.description.note October 2011 en_US


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