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dc.contributor.supervisor Koper, Nicola (Natural Resource Management) en
dc.contributor.author Selinger, Allison
dc.date.accessioned 2010-08-24T14:17:11Z
dc.date.available 2010-08-24T14:17:11Z
dc.date.issued 2010-08-24T14:17:11Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/4071
dc.description.abstract Grassland bird species have declined dramatically since 1966. This decline can be linked to changes in land use practices, such as grazing. I examined the effects of cattle grazing on the abundance of birds by testing the predictions of the More Individuals Hypothesis (MIH). The study was conducted in Grasslands National Park of Canada (GNPC) in Saskatchewan. Point counts were used to sample richness and relative abundance of birds. I sampled two groups of invertebrates: grasshoppers and carabid beetles. In addition, vegetation measurements were taken to assess the intensity of grazing. I found that (1) grasshopper abundance, richness and diversity were higher in grazed pastures; (2) carabids showed mixed responses to grazing; (3) bird abundance was correlated with carabid abundance, thus supporting the assumptions of the MIH. Overall, my results indicate that grazing can be beneficial for both birds and their invertebrate prey in southern Saskatchewan mixed-grass prairies. en
dc.format.extent 1147382 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.subject More Individuals Hypothesis en
dc.subject grazing en
dc.subject birds en
dc.title Effects of cattle grazing on the food abundance of prairie bird species in Grasslands National Park, Saskatchewan en
dc.degree.discipline Natural Resources Management en
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Wilmshurst, John (Biological Science) Winter, Maiken (Cornell University) en
dc.degree.level Master of Natural Resources Management (M.N.R.M.) en
dc.description.note October 2010 en


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