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dc.contributor.supervisor Woolford, Andrew (Sociology and Criminology) en_US
dc.contributor.author Hounslow, Wanda June
dc.date.accessioned 2018-09-18T14:41:29Z
dc.date.available 2018-09-18T14:41:29Z
dc.date.issued 2018-08-24 en_US
dc.date.submitted 2018-09-17T17:30:27Z en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/33430
dc.description.abstract This thesis is situated in theories of settler colonial genocide that define the settler colonial project—the building of a new society of settlers that necessitates the erasure of Indigeneity—as a genocidal process. By adopting the framework of the settler colonial mesh, which examines elimination processes as adaptive, enduring, and operating along multiple levels of governance and through various bureaucratic institutions, I bring the issue of disproportionate Indigenous incarceration into the genocide discussion. Through critical discourse analysis of the Federal Corrections newsletter, a document that highlighted policies and programs at the forefront of correctional reform during this era, I examine the ways in which colonial and modern liberal thinking infuse the correctional project, which, in turn, act as a force of Indigenous erasure. en_US
dc.rights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.subject Settler colonialism en_US
dc.subject Genocide en_US
dc.subject Decolonization en_US
dc.subject Incarceration en_US
dc.subject Indigenous en_US
dc.title Genocide and the maintenance of power: settler colonialism, carcerality, and the new liberal order, 1950 - 1970 en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/masterThesis
dc.type master thesis en_US
dc.degree.discipline Sociology en_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Thorpe, Jocelyn (Women's and Gender Studies) en_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Funk, Laura (Sociology and Criminology en_US
dc.degree.level Master of Arts (M.A.) en_US
dc.description.note October 2018 en_US


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