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dc.contributor.author Al Saghier, Mohammed
dc.contributor.author Taylor, Mark C
dc.contributor.author Greenberg, Howard M
dc.date.accessioned 2016-06-08T21:16:09Z
dc.date.available 2016-06-08T21:16:09Z
dc.date.issued 2001-1-1
dc.identifier.citation Mohammed Al Saghier, Mark C Taylor, and Howard M Greenberg, “Canadian-Acquired Hydatid Disease: A Case Report,” Canadian Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 12, no. 3, pp. 178-182, 2001. doi:10.1155/2001/302738
dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2001/302738
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/31443
dc.description.abstract Echinococcal cysts are unusual in Canada, and most cases seen are in immigrants. In northern Canadian communities, Echinococcus granulosis infection occasionally is acquired from dogs that feed on the entrails of caribou or moose. Seventeen patients with Canadian-acquired hydatid cysts were seen over an 11-year period. One challenging case is described in detail. An 18-year-old aboriginal woman presented with jaundice, pain, lower extremity edema and coagulopathy from a 26 cm echinococcal hepatic cyst. She was successfully treated with a combination of oral albendazole, percutaneous drainage and surgery. One-year follow-up showed no recurrence of disease. The management options for echinococcal cysts are extensively reviewed.
dc.title Canadian-Acquired Hydatid Disease: A Case Report
dc.type Journal Article
dc.language.rfc3066 en
dc.description.version Peer Reviewed
dc.rights.holder Copyright © 2001 Hindawi Publishing Corporation. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
dc.date.updated 2016-06-07T07:01:29Z


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