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dc.contributor.supervisor van Vliet, David (City Planning) en_US
dc.contributor.author Cseke, Adam
dc.date.accessioned 2015-09-10T18:43:42Z
dc.date.available 2015-09-10T18:43:42Z
dc.date.issued 2015
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/30745
dc.description.abstract This research investigates why British Columbian local governments are motivated to implement Community Amenity Contributions (CACs). Local governments that are considering adopting a CAC policy may benefit from this report. Data was obtained from developers, planners and politicians through online surveys and semi-structured interviews. The survey was analyzed using descriptive statistics and the interview data was analyzed using content analysis. All participants viewed CACs as an effective means to raise revenue to pay for growth-related costs. All participants agreed that CACs are not used as a market-based planning tool to influence urban form. Four recommendations are made: 1) obtain Canadian empirical data on the impact of Development Charges 2) improve CACs by broadening the scope of provincial DCC legislation to include amenities now funded through CACs; 3) consider the market effects of CACs, especially on affordable housing; and 4) employ economists to analyze externalized costs of development for planning departments. en_US
dc.subject Community Amenity Contributions (CACs), Urban Development, Amenity Zoning Bylaw, Growth, Policy, and Financing en_US
dc.title Municipal planning and market interventions: community amenity contributions in British Columbia en_US
dc.degree.discipline City Planning en_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Linton, David (City Planning) Christie, Gerald (Development Services, Columbia-Shuswap Regional District) en_US
dc.degree.level Master of City Planning (M.C.P.) en_US
dc.description.note October 2015 en_US


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