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dc.contributor.author Dzakpasu, Susie
dc.contributor.author Fahey, John
dc.contributor.author Kirby, Russell S
dc.contributor.author Tough, Suzanne C
dc.contributor.author Chalmers, Beverley
dc.contributor.author Heaman, Maureen I
dc.contributor.author Bartholomew, Sharon
dc.contributor.author Biringer, Anne
dc.contributor.author Darling, Elizabeth K
dc.contributor.author Lee, Lily S
dc.contributor.author McDonald, Sarah D
dc.date.accessioned 2014-04-19T15:29:45Z
dc.date.available 2014-04-19T15:29:45Z
dc.date.issued 2014-03-18
dc.identifier.citation BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth. 2014 Mar 18;14(1):106
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/23532
dc.description.abstract Abstract Background Overweight and obese women are known to be at increased risk of caesarean birth. This study estimates the contribution of prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) and gestational weight gain (GWG) to caesarean births in Canada. Methods We analyzed data from women in the Canadian Maternity Experiences Survey who had a singleton term live birth in 2005-2006. Adjusted odds ratios for caesarean birth across BMI and GWG groups were derived, separately for nulliparous women and parous women with and without a prior caesarean. Population attributable fractions of caesarean births associated with above normal BMI and excess GWG were calculated. Results The overall caesarean birth rate was 25.7%. Among nulliparous and parous women without a previous caesarean birth, rates in obese women were 45.1% and 9.7% respectively, and rates in women who gained above their recommended GWG were 33.5% and 8.0% respectively. Caesarean birth was more strongly associated with BMI than with GWG. However, due to the high prevalence of excess GWG (48.8%), the proportion of caesareans associated with above normal BMI and excess GWG was similar [10.1% (95% CI: 9.9-10.2) and 10.9% (95% CI: 10.7-11.1) respectively]. Overall, one in five (20.2%, 95% CI: 20.0-20.4) caesarean births was associated with above normal BMI or excess GWG. Conclusions Overweight and obese BMI and above recommended GWG are significantly associated with caesarean birth in singleton term pregnancies in Canada. Strategies to reduce caesarean births must include measures to prevent overweight and obese BMI prior to conception and promote recommended weight gain throughout pregnancy.
dc.rights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.title Contribution of prepregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain to caesarean birth in Canada
dc.type Journal Article
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.language.rfc3066 en
dc.description.version Peer Reviewed
dc.rights.holder Susie Dzakpasu et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
dc.date.updated 2014-04-19T15:29:45Z
dc.identifier.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2393-14-106


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