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Attitudes towards homeless people among emergency department teachers and learners: a cross-sectional study of medical students and emergency physicians

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dc.contributor.author Fine, Alison G
dc.contributor.author Zhang, Tony
dc.contributor.author Hwang, Stephen W
dc.date.accessioned 2013-10-01T19:20:10Z
dc.date.available 2013-10-01T19:20:10Z
dc.date.issued 2013-08-23
dc.identifier.citation BMC Medical Education. 2013 Aug 23;13(1):112
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/22215
dc.description.abstract Abstract Background Medical students’ attitudes and beliefs about homeless people may be shaped by the attitudes of their teachers and one of the most common sites for learning about homeless patients is the emergency department. The objective of this study was to determine if medical students in the preclinical and clinical years and emergency medicine faculty and residents have different attitudes and beliefs about homeless people. Methods The Health Professional Attitudes Toward the Homeless Inventory (HPATHI), was administered to all medical students, and emergency medicine physicians and residents at a large academic health sciences center in Canada. The HPATHI examines attitudes, interest and confidence on a 5-point Likert scale. Differences among groups were examined using the Kruskal Wallis test and Pearson’s chi-square test. Results The HPATHI was completed by 371 individuals, for an overall response rate of 55%. Analysis of dichotomized median and percentage results revealed 5/18 statements were significant by both methods. On the attitudes subscales physicians and residents as a group were more negative for 2/9 statements and on the confidence subscale more positive for 1/4 statements. The interest subscale achieved overall statistical significance with decreased positive responses among physicians and residents compared to medical students in 2/5 statements. Conclusion This study revealed divergences in attitudes, interests and beliefs among medical students and emergency medicine physicians and residents. We offer strategies for training interventions and systemic support of emergency faculty. Emergency medicine physicians can examine their role in the development of medical students through both formal and informal teaching in the emergency department.
dc.rights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.title Attitudes towards homeless people among emergency department teachers and learners: a cross-sectional study of medical students and emergency physicians
dc.type Journal Article
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.language.rfc3066 en
dc.description.version Peer Reviewed
dc.rights.holder Alison G Fine et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
dc.date.updated 2013-10-01T19:20:10Z
dc.identifier.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1472-6920-13-112


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