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dc.contributor.author Krisko, Cameron
dc.date.accessioned 2017-09-19T17:19:06Z
dc.date.available 2017-09-19T17:19:06Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/32624
dc.description.abstract Objective: There were two goals of this study. 1) To determine if there was a difference between youth with a past history of a concussion and youth with no past history of a concussion in terms of number of symptoms and days to recovery. 2) To determine if there was a difference between youth with a past history of a concussion and youth with no past history of a concussion in terms of post concussion symptom score upon initial presentation as well as a subsequent diagnosis of post concussion syndrome. Methods: A retrospective chart review was performed for all pediatric patients (between the ages seven and 19) referred to the Pan Am Concussion Program in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada between May 1, 2013 and May 1, 2015. Those patients referred for acute sport related concussions with complete medical records were included in this study. The institutional ethics review board at the University of Manitoba approved this study. Results: A total of 306 participants met the inclusion criteria. The mean age of the participants presenting to the concussion clinic without a history of a concussion was 13.4 years and they were significantly younger than participants with a history of a concussion who had a mean age of 14.9 years (p<0.0001). Among those with no concussion history, 12.3% reported a loss of consciousness; where as 17.4% of those with a concussion history reported a loss of consciousness (p=0.216). For the participants with no past concussion history, the median number of recovery days was 22 days (IQR: 15-43) compared with 23 days (IQR: 16-39) for youth with a past concussion history (p=0.41). Those participants with no concussion history had significantly fewer concussion symptoms (median: 5.5; [IQR 1-10]) compared to those with a past concussion history (median: 7.0; [IQR 2-14]; p=0.0366). The median post concussion symptom score was nine (IQR: 1-22) for those with no concussion history and 13 (IQR: 3-34) for those with a concussion history (p=0.0328). There was no significant difference in being subsequently diagnosed with post concussion syndrome between the two groups (no concussion history: 40.1%, concussion history: 41.7%, p=0.729). Conclusions: Although there was a significantly higher median number of symptoms and higher post concussion symptom score in those with a past concussion history compared with those without, there was no statistical difference in the median recovery days or subsequent post concussion syndrome diagnosis. Therefore, having a history of a concussion does not appear to increase recovery time or increase the risk of developing post concussion syndrome. en_US
dc.rights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.title The effects of multiple concussions in youth & adolescents en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/masterThesis
dc.type master thesis en_US


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