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dc.contributor.supervisorKenkel, Norman (Biological Sciences)en_US
dc.contributor.authorLevac, Joshua
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-03T13:41:13Z
dc.date.available2012-04-03T13:41:13Z
dc.date.issued2012-04-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1993/5234
dc.description.abstractTo understand the temporal dynamics of a forest, long-term direct observations are required. My study examined the long-term persistence of trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx) and white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss) in the boreal mixed-wood forests of Riding Mountain National Park. A set of 266, disturbance-free, permanent sample plots were established in 1947 (stand age = 120 years) and followed through time for 55 years. My results indicate that although the density and basal areas of aspen do decline over the 55-year period, a successful regeneration and establishment occurs around 140 years. The long-term persistence of aspen is a result of clonal reproduction following the canopy breakup beginning around 130 years or earlier. This implies that the long-term persistence of both aspen and spruce occur and the expected succession to softwood dominance does not occur.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.subjectforest ecologyen_US
dc.subjectsuccessionen_US
dc.subjectlong-termen_US
dc.subjectpersistenceen_US
dc.subjectboreal mixed-woodsen_US
dc.subjecttrembling aspenen_US
dc.subjectwhite spruceen_US
dc.titleLong-term stand dynamics of the boreal mixed-wood forests of west-central Manitobaen_US
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/masterThesis
dc.typemaster thesisen_US
dc.degree.disciplineBiological Sciencesen_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommitteeFord, Bruce (Biological Sciences) Walker, David (Environment and Geography)en_US
dc.degree.levelMaster of Science (M.Sc.)en_US
dc.description.noteMay 2012en_US
local.subject.manitobayesen_US


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