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dc.contributor.supervisor Gardiner, Phillip (Kinesiology and Recreation Management) en
dc.contributor.author Woodrow, Lindsey
dc.date.accessioned 2010-09-12T17:34:44Z
dc.date.available 2010-09-12T17:34:44Z
dc.date.issued 2010-09-12T17:34:44Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/4178
dc.description.abstract Serotonin receptor subtypes 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C are expressed in motoneurons and modulate motoneuron excitability. Serotonergic neurons, which increase their discharge with motor activity, make numerous contacts with motoneurons; however, little is known about the adaptability of motoneuron serotonin receptor expression in response to exercise. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a 7-day treadmill exercise protocol on 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptor mRNA levels in rat lumbar motoneurons. Lumbar motoneurons of exercised and sedentary animals were collected via laser capture microdissection. RNA was isolated from these samples and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reactions were performed to determine differences in receptor mRNA levels between exercised and sedentary animals. It appears that 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptor mRNA levels are unaltered following 7 days of treadmill exercise; however, future research must be done to determine if an exercise effect exists when motoneurons are differentiated by type. en
dc.format.extent 1174382 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.rights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.subject serotonin receptor en
dc.subject motoneuron en
dc.subject exercise en
dc.subject physical activity en
dc.subject exercise physiology en
dc.subject neuroscience en
dc.subject molecular biology en
dc.title The effect of short-term endurance training on 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptor mRNA levels in rat lumbar motoneurons en
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/masterThesis
dc.degree.discipline Kinesiology and Recreation Management en
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Duhamel, Todd (Kinesiology and Recreation Management) Jordan, Larry (Physiology) en
dc.degree.level Master of Science (M.Sc.) en
dc.description.note October 2010 en


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