Home

Ability to alter song in two grassland songbirds exposed to simulated anthropogenic noise is not related to pre-existing variability.

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Curry, Claire M.
dc.contributor.author Antze, Bridget
dc.contributor.author Warrington, Miyako H.
dc.contributor.author Des Brisay, Paulson G.
dc.contributor.author Koper, Nicola
dc.date.accessioned 2019-06-11T17:41:18Z
dc.date.available 2019-06-11T17:41:18Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.date.submitted 2019-06-11T17:14:49Z en
dc.identifier.citation Curry, C.M., Antze, B., Warrington, M.H., Des Brisay., P., Rosa, P. and Koper, N. 2018. Ability to alter song in two grassland songbirds exposed to simulated anthropogenic noise is not related to pre-existing variability. Bioacoustics. 27:105-130. en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/33969
dc.description.abstract Organisms encounter noise naturally in the environment. However, increasing prevalence of human-caused noise seems to be resulting in behavioural changes in many animals that can affect survival and reproduction. Not all species react the same way to noise; some adjust their vocal signals while others do not. We hypothesized that species with more variability in their vocal signals would be better able to adjust their signals to be audible over anthropogenic noise. We tested this within a large-scale manipulative experiment by recording songs of two grassland songbirds, Baird’s sparrow (Ammodramus bairdii) and Savannah sparrow (Passerculus sandwichensis), both of which are found in areas increasingly affected by energy extraction noise. We compared these species because Savannah sparrows have more variability in their songs geographically and temporally compared to Baird’s sparrows. We recorded both species’ songs before, during, and after high-fidelity playbacks of oil well drilling noise. Surprisingly, both species changed parts of their songs in the presence of noise (Baird’s sparrow usually decreasing frequency and Savannah sparrow increasing frequency) and these changes were not related to seasonal, song, or syllable variability. We suggest instead that acoustically heterogeneous environments may favor the evolution of species that are capable of adjusting their songs in response to variable ambient noise. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Taylor and Francis en_US
dc.subject mixed-grass prairie, energy development, Savannah sparrow, Baird’s sparrow, signalling, plasticity en_US
dc.title Ability to alter song in two grassland songbirds exposed to simulated anthropogenic noise is not related to pre-existing variability. en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.identifier.doi DOI: 10.1080/09524622.2017.1289123


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Research Publications [1174]
    This collection contains full text research publications authored or co-authored by University of Manitoba researchers.

Show simple item record

View Statistics