A bout of time: decolonization and futurity in Indigenous speculative fiction

dc.contributor.authorBurns, Nicole
dc.contributor.examiningcommitteeJoo, Hee-Jung Serenity (English, Theatre, Film and Media)
dc.contributor.examiningcommitteeThorpe, Jocelyn (Women's and Gender Studies)
dc.contributor.supervisorCariou, Warren
dc.date.accessioned2024-01-05T16:50:02Z
dc.date.available2024-01-05T16:50:02Z
dc.date.issued2024-01-04
dc.date.submitted2024-01-04T06:01:30Zen_US
dc.degree.disciplineEnglish, Theatre, Film and Mediaen_US
dc.degree.levelMaster of Arts (M.A.)
dc.description.abstractWorks of Indigenous speculative fiction (SF) depict a perspective of temporality that differs from the mainstream Western conception of time as linear and teleological. Novels such as Cherie Dimaline’s The Marrow Thieves and Hunting by Stars and Waubgeshig Rice’s Moon of the Crusted Snow portray settler colonialism as an ongoing process rather than a historical event; in doing so, they challenge hegemonic notions of settler futurity by asserting an Indigenous presence and affirming the inevitability of Indigenous futures. This thesis analyzes Dimaline’s and Rice’s works to examine how Indigenous SF reorients readers into Indigenous temporalities and critiques assumptions of Indigenous disappearance or victimry through their portrayals of settler colonial violence and environmental destabilization. These authors use apocalyptic and dystopian settings to demonstrate how Indigenous peoples will survive the end of colonial capitalism through self-determination and a reliance on their own epistemes. Both the characters in and readers of Indigenous SF are motivated to generate Indigenous futurisms from within the present through a revitalization of Indigenous languages and practices. This critical examination of Indigenous SF situates the genre within the contexts of ecocriticism, decolonization (or biskaabiiyang), and futurity to showcase how different perceptions of time alter the possibilities for the future.
dc.description.noteFebruary 2024
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1993/37934
dc.language.isoeng
dc.subjectIndigenous literature
dc.subjectSpeculative fiction
dc.subjectIndigenous futurisms
dc.subjectSurvivance
dc.subjectDecolonization
dc.subjectApocalypse
dc.titleA bout of time: decolonization and futurity in Indigenous speculative fiction
local.subject.manitobayes
oaire.awardTitleCanada Graduate Scholarships — Master’s program
oaire.awardURIhttps://www.nserc-crsng.gc.ca/students-etudiants/pg-cs/cgsm-bescm_eng.asp
project.funder.identifierhttps://doi.org/10.13039/501100000155
project.funder.nameSocial Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada
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