MSpace - DSpace at UofM >
Faculty of Graduate Studies (Electronic Theses and Dissertations) >
FGS - Electronic Theses & Dissertations (Public) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1993/4341

Title: Teaching children with autism to mand for information
Authors: Marion, Carole
Supervisor: Martin, Garry (Psychology)
Examining Committee: Cornick, Angela (Psychology) Yu, C.T. (Psychology) Hrycaiko, Dennis (Kinesiology and Recreation Management) Carr, James (Auburn University)
Graduation Date: February 2011
Keywords: Mands
Verbal Behaviour
Autism
Requests
Issue Date: 11-Jan-2011
Abstract: In general terms a mand is a requesting response. Typically, children learn basic mands (e.g., “I want drink”) before learning to mand for information. Across three experiments I taught children with autism to mand for information using the mands “What is it?,” “Where?,” and/or “Which?”. In Experiment 1, a modified multiple-baseline design across situations was used to evaluate a teaching procedure that consisted of contrived motivating operations, prompt fading and prompt delay, natural consequences, error correction, and a brief preference assessment for teaching “What is it?” The results demonstrated strong internal validity with each of the three participants, with each showing generalization to situations, activities, scripts, the natural environment, and over time. In Experiment 2, a modified multiple-baseline design across three participants was used to evaluate approximately the same teaching procedure for teaching “Where?” The results demonstrated strong internal validity with each of the three participants, with generalization by all three participants to novel situations, activities, location the natural environment, and over time. In Experiment 3, a modified multiple-baseline design across three participants was used to evaluate approximately the same teaching procedure for teaching “Which?” The results demonstrated strong internal validity with generalization by all three participants to novel situations, activities, scripts, the natural environment, and over time. These findings are discussed in terms of its contributions to applied behaviour analysis research on teaching mand to children with autism.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1993/4341
Appears in Collection(s):FGS - Electronic Theses & Dissertations (Public)

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
marion_carole.pdf838.92 kBAdobe PDFView/Open
View Statistics

Items in MSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

Valid XHTML 1.0! MSpace Software Copyright © 2002-2010  Duraspace - Feedback