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dc.contributor.author Vagianos, Kathy
dc.contributor.author Clara, Ian
dc.contributor.author Carr, Rachel
dc.contributor.author Graff, Leslie A.
dc.contributor.author Walker, John R.
dc.contributor.author Targownik, Laura
dc.contributor.author Lix, Lisa M.
dc.contributor.author Rogala, Linda
dc.contributor.author Miller, Norine
dc.contributor.author Bernstein, Charles N.
dc.date.accessioned 2015-05-11T17:58:47Z
dc.date.available 2015-05-11T17:58:47Z
dc.date.issued 2014-09-04
dc.identifier.citation JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2014 Sep 4. en_US
dc.identifier.other pii: 0148607114549254
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/30428
dc.description.abstract Background: A comprehensive study of what individuals with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are eating that encompasses food avoidance, dietary sugar consumption, and a comparison with the non-IBD Canadian population has not been documented. The aim was to analyze these interrelated dietary components. Methods: Food avoidance and sugar intake data were collected from 319 patients with IBD enrolled in the University of Manitoba IBD Cohort Study. Diets of those with IBD (n = 256) were compared with a matched, non-IBD Canadian cohort using the nutrition questions obtained from the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS). Results: Food avoidance among IBD is prevalent for alcohol, popcorn, legumes, nuts, seeds, deep-fried food, and processed deli meat, with a higher prevalence among those with active IBD. Patients with active IBD also consumed significantly more portions of sports drinks and sweetened beverages compared with those with inactive disease. Compared with the non-IBD Canadian population, patients with IBD consume significantly less iron-rich food but more milk. Conclusions: Food avoidance is common among those with IBD but may be due more to personal preferences, while sugar-laden beverages may be displacing other foods higher in nutrients. The overall diet of patients with IBD differed from that of the non-IBD Canadian population, but deficiencies were observed in both groups. Considering malnutrition among persons living with IBD, nutrition education by trained dietitians as part of the IBD team is imperative to address food avoidance and overall balance nutrition as part of treating and preventing nutrition deficiencies. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition en_US
dc.rights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.subject IBD en_US
dc.subject Cohort en_US
dc.subject Dietary en_US
dc.subject Bernstein en_US
dc.title What are adults with IBD eating? A closer look at the dietary habits of a population-based Canadian IBD cohort en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.type Dataset en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article


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