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dc.contributor.supervisor Schwimmer, Brian (Anthropology) Fulford, George (Anthropology) en_US
dc.contributor.author Myhre, Brian Lawrence
dc.date.accessioned 2013-09-12T17:00:42Z
dc.date.available 2013-09-12T17:00:42Z
dc.date.issued 2013-09-12
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/22187
dc.description.abstract This dissertation examines how social capital arises in eight socially networked urban Aboriginal organizations in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Two research methods are used. The “network centrality” of each organizational leader and their overall “social solidarity” within the total network spanning all eight organizations is determined using Social Network Analysis (SNA). SNA results indicate two distinct types of organizations and leadership. Detailed information on characteristics of these organizations and their leaders is derived from a thematic analysis of transcriptions of twenty-five hours of consultant interviews, supplemented by field notes based on over three hundred hours of participant-observation. Findings indicate that the eight Aboriginal organizations studied form two distinct network alliances (“band based” and “hybrid”). Band-based organizations tend to focus on clients from First Nations reserve communities, rely largely on federal funding, and adopt an institutional style of leadership. The leaders of them tend to rely on strong social ties supported by face-to-face communication. Hybrid organizations tend to focus on urban Aboriginal populations, rely on funding mostly from sources other than the federal government, and adopt a grassroots (and institutional) style of administration. Their leaders rely on a balance of strong and weak social ties; the latter mediated by computer-mediated-communication (CMC) technologies. Conclusions suggest that CMC technologies enable Aboriginal leaders to broker effective and innovative partnerships that better distribute services, responsibilities and costs. The Internet is the most vital social networking tool currently available for stimulating and supporting collective action. Regardless of their propinquity, people are using email and other Internet services to build friendships and allegiances, and to access important information, social contacts and services that enable the development of more effective social capital and community development practices among Aboriginal people living in Winnipeg. en_US
dc.rights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.subject Aboriginal en_US
dc.subject Indian en_US
dc.subject urban en_US
dc.subject organizations en_US
dc.subject social en_US
dc.subject capital en_US
dc.subject networks en_US
dc.subject SNA en_US
dc.subject communication en_US
dc.subject internet en_US
dc.subject culture en_US
dc.subject anthropology en_US
dc.title Social networks and urban Aboriginal organizations: building social capital in the electronic age en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/doctoralThesis
dc.degree.discipline Anthropology en_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Pentland, David (Anthropology) Oakes, Jill (Environment and Geography) Mignone, Javier (Family Social Sciences) Peters, Evelyn (Urban and Inner-City Studies, University of Winnipeg) en_US
dc.degree.level Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) en_US
dc.description.note October 2013 en_US


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