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dc.contributor.supervisor Wiens, John (Educational Administration, Foundations and Psychology) Senehi, Jessica (Peace and Conflict Studies) en_US
dc.contributor.author Krahn, Sandra Lynn
dc.date.accessioned 2012-09-14T20:30:34Z
dc.date.available 2012-09-14T20:30:34Z
dc.date.issued 2012-09-14
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/8855
dc.description.abstract There is an increasing trend in youth education and civil society that focuses on global citizenship. The development of the storyteller and story is a highly intuitive practice refined by experience. Literature in education and democracy, elicitive approaches to peacebuilding, and storytelling in education are reviewed. The study is based on three theoretical ideas: (1) that cultural stories encode and transmit knowledge, (2) personal narratives enable the integration of theoretical ideas into their socio-political context, and (3) that storytelling can help students apply their knowledge through positive action. This qualitative study uses grounded theory and a multi-method approach, drawing primarily on twelve semi-structured interviews. The data revealed four key themes that guide storytellers’ learning outcomes: knowledge, culture, dialogue, and agency. Storytellers described storytelling as a powerful pedagogical practice that provides democratic and inclusive spaces capable of facilitating dialogue and promoting student agency. en_US
dc.subject Storytelling en_US
dc.subject Peacebuilding en_US
dc.subject Citizenship en_US
dc.subject Education en_US
dc.title Storytelling for youth education in civil society in Winnipeg en_US
dc.degree.discipline Interdisciplinary Program en_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Sawatsky, Jarem (Canadian Mennonite University) Hewlett, Kim (Engineering) en_US
dc.degree.level Master of Arts (M.A.) en_US
dc.description.note October 2012 en_US


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