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Examining the experience of the Aboriginal Justice Inquiry-Child Welfare Initiative process: a case study examining the clients' perspective

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dc.contributor.supervisor Gosek, Gwendolyn (Social Work) en_US
dc.contributor.author Cameron, Jolene
dc.date.accessioned 2012-08-21T20:40:37Z
dc.date.available 2012-08-21T20:40:37Z
dc.date.issued 2012-08-21
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/8450
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this study has been to explore the experience of parents who were part of the Aboriginal Justice Inquiry–Child Welfare Initiative (AJI-CWI). This restructuring of the child welfare system in Manitoba was the first of its kind in Canada. To date, no research has been done which explores the clients’ experience of this restructuring. This research was done using an Indigenous perspective and a qualitative and quantitative methodology and case study. Three themes were identified and discussed: Love, Trust, and Trauma. The research findings suggest that the AJI-CWI was an important and necessary change to the child welfare system for Aboriginal people in Manitoba. However, systemic issues which have been in existence since before the restructuring occurred, continue to affect the way in which child welfare services are delivered. Recommendations for child welfare practitioners, future research, policy, and education are discussed. en_US
dc.subject child welfare en_US
dc.subject Aboriginal en_US
dc.title Examining the experience of the Aboriginal Justice Inquiry-Child Welfare Initiative process: a case study examining the clients' perspective en_US
dc.degree.discipline Social Work en_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Halonen, Deana (Social Work) Shore, Fred (Native Studies) Jones, Kathleen (Social Work) en_US
dc.degree.level Master of Social Work (M.S.W.) en_US
dc.description.note October 2012 en_US


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