Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Baker, Gordon D. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2012-05-15T15:54:01Z
dc.date.available 2012-05-15T15:54:01Z
dc.date.issued 1976 en_US
dc.identifier ocm72733475 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/6135
dc.description.abstract More than three hundred tests were made to determine typical sound levels of many types of farm machinery used by farm workers in Manitoba. Sound pressure levels were measured at the operator's ear with portable measuring and recording equipment. Only twenty percent of the tractors tested produced sound levels of less than 90 dBA at high idle when loaded. The sound level at the operator's ear for eight forage choppers ranged from 95 to 109 dBA. Most self-propelled swathers, power-take-off combines, grinder-mixers, forage blowers, balers, vegetable harvesters, grain dryers and even small riding garden tractors produced sound levels in excess of 90 dBA. Very few farm machines had sound levels of 90 dBA or less and therefore a risk of hearing impairment is possible for operators exposed to eight or more hours per day on a continuous basis. Tests were perfomred on a water cooled self-propelled windrower to determine its dominant noise sources. Various engine, exhaust, and hydrostatic transmission treatments were tried to reduce the sound level at the operator's ear. The exhaust and transmission treatments were very beneficial. en_US
dc.format.extent 1 v. (various paging) : en_US
dc.language en en_US
dc.rights en_US
dc.title Sound levels on Manitoba farms and reduction of windrower noise en_US
dc.degree.discipline Agricultural Engineering en_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

View Statistics