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dc.contributor.supervisor Linden, Rick (Sociology) en_US
dc.contributor.author Hanly, Mark
dc.date.accessioned 2012-03-30T19:35:44Z
dc.date.available 2012-03-30T19:35:44Z
dc.date.issued 2012-03-30
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/5224
dc.description.abstract Security has consistently been identified as a State prerogative whereby the State holds a monopoly on the governance of all such activities within itself. This understanding has been challenged over the past two decades by the proliferation of security providers in both state and non-state forms. The frameworks of anchored pluralism and private governance have expanded criminologists’ understanding of security governance, moving it beyond a state-centric model. The nodal governance paradigm encompasses these concepts and develops them by emphasizing an increasing ‘pluralisation’ of security governance. This study focuses on the University of Manitoba Security Service as an institution, mapping the ways in which it forms relationships with other security nodes to form a complex system of governance. This thesis illuminates that the University of Manitoba Security Service is a node of security governance, and thus it uses both formal and informal mechanisms to network with other security bodies. en_US
dc.subject Security en_US
dc.subject Nodal en_US
dc.title Nodal governance and security provision: the University of Manitoba Security Service en_US
dc.degree.discipline Sociology en_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Kueneman, Rodney (Sociology) MacLean, George (Political Studies) en_US
dc.degree.level Master of Arts (M.A.) en_US
dc.description.note May 2012 en_US


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