Show simple item record

dc.contributor.supervisor Skelton, Ian (City Planning) en_US
dc.contributor.author Maes, Christina
dc.date.accessioned 2012-01-09T19:38:21Z
dc.date.available 2012-01-09T19:38:21Z
dc.date.issued 2012-01-09
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/5049
dc.description.abstract Increased knowledge about Aboriginal women’s unique experiences of homelessness will assist in improving and altering service systems. Planning theory suggests planners can consciously work to ensure the stories of marginalized peoples are heard and understood, which can transform systems and institutions. From an Indigenous planning perspective, transformation must involve reflecting on and altering colonial systems. Using survey, focus group, and interview methodologies, various types of stories were told, analysed and retold as common themes and overarching considerations. In this research, stories about trauma and tragedy were told as common and shared experiences. The women participating spoke about a need to be heard and respected and throughout their stories gaps in services were shown to dramatically reduce their ability to change their own circumstances. Recommendations were developed with Aboriginal women experiencing homelessness with the intent of transforming systems to begin a new story of healing and hope. en_US
dc.rights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.subject homelessness en_US
dc.subject aboriginal en_US
dc.subject planning en_US
dc.title Shared stories, silent understandings: aboriginal women speak on homelessness en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/masterThesis
dc.degree.discipline City Planning en_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Johnson, Molly (City Planning) Wuttunee, Wanda (Native Studies) en_US
dc.degree.level Master of City Planning (M.C.P.) en_US
dc.description.note February 2012 en_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

View Statistics