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dc.contributor.supervisorGuth, DeLloyd J. (Law)en_US
dc.contributor.authorEffler, Barry Curtis
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-14T14:29:05Z
dc.date.available2011-09-14T14:29:05Z
dc.date.issued2011-09-14
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1993/4918
dc.description.abstractThis Master of Laws thesis provides an analysis of Manitoba Court of Queen's Bench civil money judgment cases, sampled quantitatively for 1995 and 2004, to examine the length of time from the filing of a claim to judgment being issued, before and after the implementation of Manitoba Queen s Bench Rule 20A. The historical roots of Manitoba court procedure and certain enforcement processes are examined to explain historically: if you get the judgment, how do you get the money? The procedural law is rooted in the English medieval common law system of judicial writs, most recently made more efficient by Manitoba Queen s Bench Rule 20A. This remains basic to issues of law reform for all common law jurisdictions, including Saskatchewan s Enforcement of Money Judgments Act, and this thesis concludes with a set of qualitative recommendations.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.subjectRule 20Aen_US
dc.subjectQueen's Benchen_US
dc.subjectenforcementen_US
dc.subjectmoney judgmenten_US
dc.subjecthistory of courten_US
dc.subjectwriten_US
dc.titleManitoba Court of Queen's Bench Rule 20A: history of the law regarding civil money judgment and mortgage enforcementen_US
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/masterThesis
dc.typemaster thesisen_US
dc.degree.disciplineLawen_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommitteeShariff, Mary (Law) Cuming, Ronald C. C. (University of Saskatchewan)en_US
dc.degree.levelMaster of Laws (LL.M.)en_US
dc.description.noteOctober 2011en_US


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