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dc.contributor.supervisor Enns, Charlotte (Educational Administration, Foundations and Psychology) en_US
dc.contributor.author Wells, Alison
dc.date.accessioned 2011-07-19T14:25:36Z
dc.date.available 2011-07-19T14:25:36Z
dc.date.issued 2011-07-19
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/4743
dc.description.abstract Inquiry-based learning (IBL) has existed since the early 1500’s and research points to it being a successful pedagogy, so why do so few educators use it? One reason may be the confusion found in the literature encountered by educators. In light of this confusion, how teachers defined and implemented IBL in diverse, 21st Century classrooms was investigated. Looking at whether IBL was, or could be, an inclusive practice was also researched. Furthermore, the possibility that inquiry-based learning (IBL) encompassed differentiated instruction (DI) in its implementation and could therefore be used as a process to incorporate both was explored. To investigate these ideas, current literature was reviewed; including the works of John Dewey and Lev Vygotsky, and a qualitative research project was conducted using a phenomenological method. The research consisted of observations and interviews in the natural setting, of an inclusive elementary classroom. en_US
dc.subject inquiry-based learning en_US
dc.subject differentiated instruction en_US
dc.subject inclusion en_US
dc.subject John Dewey en_US
dc.subject Lev Vygotsky en_US
dc.title Inquiry-based learning: fact or fallacy? en_US
dc.degree.discipline Educational Administration, Foundations and Psychology en_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Freeze, D. Richard (Educational Administration, Foundations and Psychology) Smith, Karen (Curriculum, Teaching and Learning) en_US
dc.degree.level Master of Education (M.Ed.) en_US
dc.description.note October 2011 en_US


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