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dc.contributor.supervisorBritton, M.G.(Biosystems Engineering) Ingram, Sandra (Adjunct, Biosystems Engineering)en
dc.contributor.authorEnnis, David
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-07T18:05:24Z
dc.date.available2011-04-07T18:05:24Z
dc.date.issued2011-04-07T18:05:24Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1993/4457
dc.description.abstractThe water source for The City of Winnipeg is Shoal Lake near the Manitoba-Ontario border, 145km east of the city, and is delivered by a gravity powered system known as the Winnipeg Aqueduct. It was built during World War 1. The system is 150km in length, primarily in an enclosed conduit operating under open channel flow, and crosses eight rivers. The project was built by the Greater Winnipeg Water District. The concept of the Water District, is administration, the design of the aqueduct’s components, the contract administration, and the construction procedures employed in implementing the system are explained. The purchase and topographical modification of land belonging to the First Nation residents of Shoal Lake Band 40 was essential to the development of the project. There are ongoing issues for this First Nation arising from that purchase.en
dc.format.extent3284906 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.subjectaqueducten
dc.subjectWinnipegen
dc.subjectShoal Lakeen
dc.titleDeveloping a domestic water supply for Winnipeg from Shoal Lake and Lake of the Woods: the Greater Winnipeg Water District Aqueduct, 1905 – 1919en
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/masterThesis
dc.typemaster thesisen_US
dc.degree.disciplineBiosystems Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommitteeFriesen,Gerald (History) Nesmith, Tom (History)en
dc.degree.levelMaster of Science (M.Sc.)en_US
dc.description.noteMay 2011en


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