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dc.contributor.supervisorEigenbrod, Renate (Native Studies)en
dc.contributor.authorFontaine, Leah Marisa
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-30T15:10:21Z
dc.date.available2010-09-30T15:10:21Z
dc.date.issued2010-09-30T15:10:21Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1993/4255
dc.description.abstractHistorical trauma has affected the lives of all Aboriginal people in Canada. This thesis argues that Aboriginal art has the potential to contribute to recovery from trauma on an individual and a communal level but that its continued analysis through the Western gaze may take away from this restorative impact. The main purpose of this research is therefore to explore how historical trauma theory and the Aboriginal ethos can be viewed together to create a new hybridized lens though which to interpret Aboriginal art. This lens has been named the Spirit Mender Model. The thesis explains and illustrates how this model provides a useful Aboriginal lens through which to understand, interpret, and appreciate Aboriginal art in it restorative impacts.en
dc.format.extent3897963 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.subjectFine Arten
dc.subjectNative Studiesen
dc.titleSpirit menders: the expression of trauma in art practices by Manitoba Aboriginal women artistsen
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/masterThesis
dc.typemaster thesisen_US
dc.degree.disciplineNative Studiesen_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommitteeLaRocque, Emma (Native Studies) Botar, Oliver (School of Art)en
dc.degree.levelMaster of Arts (M.A.)en_US
dc.description.noteFebruary 2011en
local.subject.manitobayesen_US


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