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dc.contributor.supervisor Elias, Brenda (Community Health Sciences) en
dc.contributor.author Campbell, Rhonda Dawn
dc.date.accessioned 2010-09-13T14:12:04Z
dc.date.available 2010-09-13T14:12:04Z
dc.date.issued 2010-09-13T14:12:04Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/4180
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between adversity, resiliency and substance use among Manitoba First Nation girls living on reserve, ages 12 to 17 years. Five hundred and fifty girls completed an in person survey of 138 items on a variety of health and well-being issues. The results of this study indicate that the prevalence of substance use is disturbingly high among First Nation girls. A logistic regression analysis determined that age, family discord, and parental substance abuse were all significant predicators of increased substance use among First Nation girls. Family connectedness, visiting and spending time with family were protective against substance use. Surprisingly, high cultural engagement was not protective against substance use in this study, but beliefs in the importance of cultural activities were protective. In conclusion, this study showed that taking a resiliency approach to examine health behaviors among First Nation girls is beneficial and can best inform policies and programs to reduce substance use. en
dc.format.extent 1087537 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.subject resiliency en
dc.subject substance use en
dc.subject First Nation en
dc.title Resiliency factors and substance use among Manitoba First Nation girls living on reserve en
dc.degree.discipline Community Health Sciences en
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Mignone, Javier (Faculty of Human Ecology) O'Neil, John (Health Sciences) Simon Fraser University en
dc.degree.level Master of Science (M.Sc.) en
dc.description.note October 2011 en


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