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dc.contributor.supervisor Matheson, Carl (Philosophy) en
dc.contributor.author Dyck, John
dc.date.accessioned 2010-09-08T19:19:25Z
dc.date.available 2010-09-08T19:19:25Z
dc.date.issued 2010-09-08T19:19:25Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/4107
dc.description.abstract This thesis evaluates Lydia Goehr’s claim that the musical work-concept did not regulate musical practice before the watershed date of 1800. In the first chapter, I evaluate Goehr’s arguments for this claim from historical musicology. I appeal both to recent secondary research sources in musicology, and to philosophical analysis. The second and third chapters focus on philosophical aspects of Goehr’s watershed claim. In the second chapter, I focus on understanding Goehr’s claim that a regulative shift occurred during the watershed date—that is, a change in the norms of musical practice. I argue that this shift is properly understood as a shift in unconscious, rather than conscious, concepts about musical practice. In the third chapter, I consider the ontological implications of Goehr’s view; Goehr adopts a view according to which musical works do not exist. I show that the argument for this view is unsound. en
dc.format.extent 793042 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.rights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.subject philosophy of music en
dc.subject historical musicology en
dc.title Did Bach compose musical works? An evaluation of Goehr's watershed thesis en
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/masterThesis
dc.degree.discipline Philosophy en
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Tillman, Chris (Philosophy) Burleson, Richard (Music) en
dc.degree.level Master of Arts (M.A.) en
dc.description.note October 2010 en


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