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dc.contributor.supervisor Brown, Brenda (Landscape Architecture) en
dc.contributor.author Derksen, Matthew J
dc.date.accessioned 2010-09-03T18:30:33Z
dc.date.available 2010-09-03T18:30:33Z
dc.date.issued 2010-09-03T18:30:33Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/4096
dc.description.abstract The relationship between humans and the rest of the natural world has become discordant. Many of the harmful effects of this relationship, such as unsustainable forestry practices and oil spills, are easily visible. Conversely, much of the harm, such as the effects of climate change, is subtle and difficult to perceive. Landscape architecture, as a discipline and practice, is well-suited to lead a shift toward a healthier relationship between human and non-human nature. This practicum seeks to make various climate change-related phenomena within Manitoba landscapes visible. Conceived as tourist destinations, three distinct landscapes likely to undergo dramatic climate change-induced alterations are identified. For each site an intervention is proposed highlighting these changes. Thus, a global phenomenon is made visible at a local scale. en
dc.format.extent 5766671 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.rights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.subject Landscape architecture en
dc.subject Climate change en
dc.subject Design en
dc.subject Eco-tourism en
dc.subject Nature en
dc.subject Environmentalism en
dc.subject Ecological health en
dc.subject Mental health en
dc.title Consequential landscapes: a design response to anthropogenic climate change en
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/masterThesis
dc.degree.discipline Landscape Architecture en
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Trottier, Jean (Landscape Architecture) Marr, Ruth (Marr Consulting) en
dc.degree.level Master of Landscape Architecture (M.Land.Arch.) en
dc.description.note October 2010 en


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