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dc.contributor.supervisor Finnegan, Robert (English, Film, and Theatre) en
dc.contributor.author Burt, Cameron Bryce
dc.date.accessioned 2010-09-03T15:14:03Z
dc.date.available 2010-09-03T15:14:03Z
dc.date.issued 2010-09-03T15:14:03Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/4093
dc.description.abstract This study provides a new reading of Geoffrey Chaucer’s Prioress’s Tale and considers its purpose within the context of the Canterbury Tales. I argue that the Tale, as an exemplum, demonstrates the dangers of tale-telling, and exposes the moral discrepancies of the Canterbury tale-telling competition and the pilgrims’ use of stories as verbal assaults against one another. I argue that the Tale condemns the unchristian-like “actions” of the Christians within its frame as they respond to the clergeon’s murder; the Tale’s ending presents a cathartic response from this congregation, which indicates their understanding of the clergeon’s martyrdom. It also provokes a similar response from the Canterbury pilgrims, which serves to silence them, and to create a paradox that disrupts possible responses to the Tale. Further, Chaucer’s Retraction at the end of the Tales is intended to silence the poet’s critics through the creation of a similar paradox. en
dc.format.extent 387417 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.subject Chaucer en
dc.subject Prioress's Tale en
dc.subject St. Augustine of Hippo en
dc.subject Silence en
dc.title Chaucer and his prioress: feigning silence in the "Prioress's Tale" and "Chaucer's Retraction" en
dc.degree.discipline English, Film, and Theatre en
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Watt, David (English, Film, and Theatre) MacKendrick, Kenneth (Religion) en
dc.degree.level Master of Arts (M.A.) en
dc.description.note October 2010 en


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