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dc.contributor.supervisor Cook, Terry (History) en
dc.contributor.author Nordland, Jonathan
dc.date.accessioned 2010-04-12T13:58:04Z
dc.date.available 2010-04-12T13:58:04Z
dc.date.issued 2010-04-12T13:58:04Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/3971
dc.description.abstract This thesis examines the evolution of archival theory in light of the ascendance of human rights in Western society. Archives are situated as integral instruments in the protection of human rights within a Western context due to the European preference towards written evidence and bureaucratic systems. The thesis uses a negative case study to demonstrate the power of the record in affecting the human rights of citizens, but also situates access to the government archive among human rights. en
dc.format.extent 1222415 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.rights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.subject Archives en
dc.subject Human rights en
dc.subject Bureaucracy en
dc.subject Information rights en
dc.subject Australia en
dc.subject Queensland en
dc.subject Heiner Affair en
dc.title Human rights and archives: lessons from the Heiner Affair en
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/masterThesis
dc.degree.discipline History en
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Churchill, David (History) Nesmith, Tom (History) Smandych, Russell (Sociology) en
dc.degree.level Master of Arts (M.A.) en
dc.description.note May 2010 en


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