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dc.contributor.supervisor Bak, Greg (History) en_US
dc.contributor.author Roy, Jordan
dc.date.accessioned 2019-12-12T22:19:02Z
dc.date.available 2019-12-12T22:19:02Z
dc.date.issued 2019-12-09 en_US
dc.date.submitted 2019-12-09T18:54:47Z en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/34406
dc.description.abstract New emulation technologies have emerged in the form of Emulation as a Service, and are currently in the late stages of development. These projects have the potential to have positive implications for digital preservation and access. The nature and scope of these projects however, requires examination. A look at what these technologies can do, as well as how they fit into current archival systems, is a necessity. As these technologies allow for the presentation and maintenance of previously neglected properties of the record, there emerges a need to understand why these interactive aspects are important. Archivists will need to begin to think about how these technologies function and can fit into current and prospective archival methods, in order to most effectively make use of them. en_US
dc.subject Digital preservation en_US
dc.subject Interactivity en_US
dc.subject Archives en_US
dc.subject Emulation en_US
dc.title Preserving interactivity: towards next generation digital preservation philosophy and systems en_US
dc.degree.discipline History en_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Caudano, Anne-Laurence (History) en_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Lawrie, Paul (History) en_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Frogner, Raymond (National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation) en_US
dc.degree.level Master of Arts (M.A.) en_US
dc.description.note February 2020 en_US


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