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dc.contributor.supervisor Sinclair, Niiggaan (Native Studies) en_US
dc.contributor.author Lagace, Naithan
dc.date.accessioned 2019-01-10T21:28:57Z
dc.date.available 2019-01-10T21:28:57Z
dc.date.issued 2018 en_US
dc.date.submitted 2019-01-03T17:23:02Z en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/33700
dc.description.abstract This thesis analyzes and discusses the complexities of digital representations involving Indigenous peoples through video games. Connecting both Game Theory and Native Studies, I analyze how digital games incorporate identity, culture, and relationships in diverse and intellectual ways and provide new spaces for Indigenous agency and semiotics. Beginning with an analysis of several historical and negative representations of Indigenous peoples, I then compare those tropes to projects within today’s environment and mainstream video game companies, independent companies, and educational service providers. I assert that while some digital media representations of Indigenous cultures are stereotypical and problematic, others facilitate a sense of cultural continuance and survivance. Lastly, some video games display both stereotypical and cultural continuance within them. en_US
dc.rights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.subject Native Studies en_US
dc.title Indigenous Representations and the Impacts of Video Games Media on Indigenous Identity en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/masterThesis
dc.type master thesis en_US
dc.degree.discipline Native Studies en_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Miller, Cary (Native Studies) Cariou, Warrren (English) en_US
dc.degree.level Master of Arts (M.A.) en_US
dc.description.note February 2019 en_US


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