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dc.contributor.supervisor Kruk, Richard (Psychology) en_US
dc.contributor.author Rosenberg, Lindsay
dc.date.accessioned 2018-09-25T13:54:38Z
dc.date.available 2018-09-25T13:54:38Z
dc.date.issued 2018-08-29 en_US
dc.date.submitted 2018-09-25T13:52:32Z en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/33465
dc.description.abstract Morphological awareness is the ability to consider and manipulate the smallest units of meaning in language. To measure it, a masked priming lexical decision task was used, where prime words varied, from morphologically related to the target (teacher-TEACH), to pseudo-suffixed relationships (corner-CORN). A dual-route theory of orthographic processing suggests that these words are processed differently; The former through coarse-grained processing, where the word is processed at once, and the latter through fine-grained, where each letter and its location is processed. For good readers in grade 6, letter order and suffix type modulated priming effects. For grade 6 poor readers and grade 2 readers, priming was not modulated by suffix type. For orthographic processing, grade 6 readers used fine-grained processing, whereas grade 2 readers used coarse-grained processing. This suggests that reading exposure is the driving factor in the type of orthographic processing used in word recognition for good and poor readers. en_US
dc.subject Reading en_US
dc.subject Literacy development en_US
dc.subject Morphological awareness en_US
dc.subject Morpho-orthographic segmentation en_US
dc.title When is a corner like corn? Morpho-orthographic segmenting skills in children who struggle with reading en_US
dc.degree.discipline Psychology en_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Soderstrom, Melanie (Psychology) en_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Russell, Kevin (Linguistics) en_US
dc.degree.level Master of Arts (M.A.) en_US
dc.description.note October 2018 en_US


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