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dc.contributor.supervisorSinclair, Niigaanwewidam James (Native Studies)en_US
dc.contributor.authorBone, Jason L.
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-12T15:38:00Z
dc.date.available2017-01-12T15:38:00Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1993/32012
dc.description.abstractSacred story has historically been essential to the proper functioning of Anishinaabe society. These represent the ways humans should live and act in the world in harmony with others, the land, and the spirit world. The transmission of these essential codes of conduct through sacred story is what has sustained identity and culture throughout history. As Indigenous languages were stolen from Indigenous people through the residential school system, so too were stories. My thesis argues that Aadisookewin such as Baagak can foster the recovery of Indigenous identity and help heal the wounds of colonization and facilitate reconciliation. To make this point I include a historical examination of existing research on Baagak derived from written accounts from theearly 1900's to the present day and analyze these narratives in their own spaces and places, asserting they provide important understandings to what constitutes Anishinaabe identity, community, and culture.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.subjectBaagaken_US
dc.subjectAadisookaanen_US
dc.subjectAadisookewinen_US
dc.subjectNative Studiesen_US
dc.subjectIndigenousen_US
dc.titleBaagak Aadisookewin: legends of history and memoryen_US
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/masterThesis
dc.typemaster thesisen_US
dc.degree.disciplineNative Studiesen_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommitteeKulchyski, Peter (Native Studies) Thorpe, Jocelyn (Women's and Gender Studies)en_US
dc.degree.levelMaster of Arts (M.A.)en_US
dc.description.noteFebruary 2017en_US
local.subject.manitobayesen_US


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