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dc.contributor.supervisor Stewart, Ronald (Environment and Geography) en_US
dc.contributor.author Hung, Ida
dc.date.accessioned 2016-12-15T22:38:14Z
dc.date.available 2016-12-15T22:38:14Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/31960
dc.description.abstract A field campaign was conducted in March and April 2015 in the Kananaskis Valley of Alberta to investigate the formation and characteristics of ice crystals and solid precipitation particles in the lee of the Rocky Mountains. This thesis examines data from 11 storms producing mainly light precipitation within generally sub-saturated surface and near-surface conditions. Instruments utilized include soundings, radar images, and surface observations, but the focus is on the analysis of 1,183 microphotographic images of precipitation particles. The particles (diameters up to 24 mm) were placed into 12 categories with rimed irregular snow particles being most common. Unrimed and rimed particles were commonly (14% of images) observed simultaneously and 62% of particles were rimed. Rimed, dense particles were less likely to sublimate before reaching the surface in the dry sub-cloud region that was at least partially a result of the air aloft being directed mainly towards the east and ‘downslope’. en_US
dc.subject Precipitation, Alberta, Ice crystals, Formation, Characteristics, Rocky Mountains, Kananaskis en_US
dc.title Characteristics and formation of precipitation over the Kananaskis Emergency Site during March and April 2015 en_US
dc.degree.discipline Environment and Geography en_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Hanesiak, John (Environment and Geography) Theriault, Julie (Université du Québec à Montréal) Kochtubajda, Bob (Environment and Climate Change Canada) en_US
dc.degree.level Master of Science (M.Sc.) en_US
dc.description.note February 2017 en_US


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