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dc.contributor.authorBhagirath, Anjali Y
dc.contributor.authorLi, Yanqi
dc.contributor.authorSomayajula, Deepti
dc.contributor.authorDadashi, Maryam
dc.contributor.authorBadr, Sara
dc.contributor.authorDuan, Kangmin
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-06T17:51:15Z
dc.date.available2016-12-06T17:51:15Z
dc.date.issued2016-12-05
dc.identifier.citationBMC Pulmonary Medicine. 2016 Dec 05;16(1):174
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12890-016-0339-5
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1993/31944
dc.description.abstractAbstract Background The airways of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are highly complex, subject to various environmental conditions as well as a distinct microbiota. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is recognized as one of the most important pulmonary pathogens and the predominant cause of morbidity and mortality in CF. A multifarious interplay between the host, pathogens, microbiota, and the environment shapes the course of the disease. There have been several excellent reviews detailing CF pathology, Pseudomonas and the role of environment in CF but only a few reviews connect these entities with regards to influence on the overall course of the disease. A holistic understanding of contributing factors is pertinent to inform new research and therapeutics. Discussion In this article, we discuss the deterministic alterations in lung physiology as a result of CF. We also revisit the impact of those changes on the microbiota, with special emphasis on P. aeruginosa and the influence of other non-genetic factors on CF. Substantial past and current research on various genetic and non-genetic aspects of cystic fibrosis has been reviewed to assess the effect of different factors on CF pulmonary infection. A thorough review of contributing factors in CF and the alterations in lung physiology indicate that CF lung infection is multi-factorial with no isolated cause that should be solely targeted to control disease progression. A combinatorial approach may be required to ensure better disease outcomes. Conclusion CF lung infection is a complex disease and requires a broad multidisciplinary approach to improve CF disease outcomes. A holistic understanding of the underlying mechanisms and non-genetic contributing factors in CF is central to development of new and targeted therapeutic strategies.
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.titleCystic fibrosis lung environment and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.language.rfc3066en
dc.rights.holderThe Author(s).
dc.date.updated2016-12-06T07:05:30Z


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