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dc.contributor.supervisor McManus, Kirk (Biochemistry and Medical Genetics) en_US
dc.contributor.author Guppy, Brent
dc.date.accessioned 2016-09-26T15:56:31Z
dc.date.available 2016-09-26T15:56:31Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/31860
dc.description.abstract By 2030, the global colorectal cancer burden is projected to approximately double. This highlights the immediate need to expand our understanding of the etiological origins of colorectal cancer, so that novel therapeutic strategies can be identified and validated. The putative tumor suppressor gene RNF20 encodes a histone H2B mono-ubiquitin ligase and has been found altered/mutated in colorectal and numerous other cancer types. Several studies suggest that RNF20, and by extension mono-ubiquitinated histone H2B (H2Bub1), play important roles in maintaining genome stability in human cells. Indeed, hypomorphic RNF20 expression and/or function have been shown to underlie several phenotypes consistent with genome instability, making aberrant RNF20 biology a potential driver in oncogenesis. Through an evolutionarily conserved trans-histone pathway, RNF20 and H2Bub1 have been shown to modulate downstream di-methylation events at lysines 4 (H3K4me2) and 79 (H3K79me2) of histone H3. Accordingly, understanding the biology associated with RNF20, H2Bub1, H3K4me2, and H3K79me2 is an essential preliminary step towards understanding the etiological origins of cancer-associated RNF20 alterations and identifying a novel therapeutic strategy to selectively kill RNF20-deficient cancers. In this thesis, I employ single-cell imaging, and multiple biochemical techniques to investigate the spatial and temporal patterning and characterize the biology of RNF20, H2Bub1, H3K4me2 and H3K79me2 throughout the cell cycle. In addition, I employ the CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing system to generate RNF20-deficient HCT116 cells. Finally, I employ synthetic lethal strategies to selectively kill RNF20-depleted cells. In conclusion, the research chapters contained within this thesis have characterized putative drivers in cancer (Chapter 3), generated a valuable research reagent for CRISPR-Cas9 ii genome editing experiments (Chapter 4), and identified a novel therapeutic strategy to selectively kill certain cancer cells (Chapter 5). This thesis has increased our understanding of the etiological origins of cancer and generated novel reagents and treatments strategies that after further validation and clinical studies, could be employed to reduce morbidity and mortality rates associated with cancer. en_US
dc.subject RNF20 en_US
dc.subject H2Bub1 en_US
dc.subject H3K79me2 en_US
dc.subject H3K4me2 en_US
dc.subject CRISPR-Cas9 en_US
dc.subject Synthetic lethality en_US
dc.subject Colorectal cancer en_US
dc.title Characterizing and selectively targeting RNF20 defects within colorectal cancer cells en_US
dc.degree.discipline Biochemistry and Medical Genetics en_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Davie, James (Biochemistry and Medical Genetics) Mai, Sabine (Physiology) Kung, Sam (Immunology) Poirier, Guy (Proteomics) en_US
dc.degree.level Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) en_US
dc.description.note October 2016 en_US


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