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dc.contributor.supervisor Mackenzie, Corey (Psychology) en_US
dc.contributor.author Reynolds, Kristin
dc.date.accessioned 2016-09-13T20:11:01Z
dc.date.available 2016-09-13T20:11:01Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/31719
dc.description.abstract A growing body of research has emphasized the prevalent mental health problems faced by the fastest-growing demographic segment of Canada’s population, older adults, in addition to their particularly low rates of mental health service use. Research has also begun to demonstrate that although older adults express a desire to be involved in their health care decision-making, they are often not given sufficient information to participate in this process. In light of low rates of service use and generally poor mental health literacy, defined as knowledge and beliefs about the recognition, prevention, and management of mental health problems, several researchers posit that older adults experience a gap in the knowledge translation of mental health information. The present research explores older adults’ pathways to mental health information and treatment. In Study 1, individual interviews were conducted with older adults who came to seek psychological treatment for mental health problems (n = 15), and analyzed according to narrative analysis. The main storylines across participants’ narratives of treatment seeking included resistance to being labeled with mental health problems, muddling through the treatment seeking process, and interpretations of psychological treatment. Findings are discussed within the context of increasing efforts to enhance clarity in the complex process of seeking treatment for mental health problems. In Study 2, older adults’ mental health information preferences and predictors of information preferences were examined in a sample of community-dwelling older adults (n = 229). Results demonstrated that despite being unfamiliar with mental health treatment options, older adults reported a strong interest in receiving detailed information concerning a variety of mental health treatment options. Family, friends, and health care providers were highly rated informational sources; and written formats and discussions with health care providers were highly rated informational formats. The most consistent predictors of mental health information preferences included attitudes toward seeking psychological treatment and social support. Findings are contextualized within the importance of increasing the mental health literacy of older adults through knowledge translation efforts. Overall, findings of this research provide clear directions for decreasing the gap in mental health knowledge translation among older adults. en_US
dc.subject Older adults en_US
dc.subject Mental health en_US
dc.subject Service use en_US
dc.subject Narrative analysis en_US
dc.subject Quantitative survey en_US
dc.subject Knowledge translation en_US
dc.subject Information preferences en_US
dc.title Older adults' pathways to mental health information and treatment: Bridging the gap in knowledge translation en_US
dc.degree.discipline Psychology en_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Walker, John (Psychology) Koven, Lesley (Clinical Health Psychology) Funk, Laura (Sociology) Medved, Maria (Guest) Segal, Daniel (University of Colorado, Colorado Springs) en_US
dc.degree.level Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) en_US
dc.description.note October 2016 en_US


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