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dc.contributor.supervisor Peter, Tracey (Sociology) en_US
dc.contributor.author Edkins, Tamara
dc.date.accessioned 2016-09-11T20:26:47Z
dc.date.available 2016-09-11T20:26:47Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/31670
dc.description.abstract Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) individuals belong to one of the most discriminated groups in Canada and abroad. Using minority stress theory, researchers have found that such a climate of homophobia and transphobia has been associated with negative mental health outcomes among LGBTQ individuals. However, despite the presence of campaigns such as the “It Gets Better Project”, few academics have explored whether it does “get better” for LGBTQ people who have experienced anti-LGBTQ prejudice in their youth; and further, few academics have explored whether such individuals who have experienced prejudice can flourish in terms of their positive mental health. Positive mental health explores how individuals can be resilient and thrive within society; it looks at positive feelings people have about themselves, others and society. However, it does not mean an absence of negative mental health outcomes, in that individuals with depression, for example, can also flourish in respect to their positive mental health. The purpose of the current thesis is to extend minority stress theory in order to consider the long-term relationship between childhood bullying and positive mental health among LGBTQ adults. Using a hierarchical ordinary least squares regression model and a sample of LGBTQ education professionals, the current study found that there was a negative long-term relationship between childhood bullying and positive mental health among LGBTQ individuals. Further, disclosing one’s LGBTQ identity, and measures of LGBTQ-inclusion and support were all associated with flourishing levels of positive mental health, although they did not fully mitigate the effects of childhood bullying. The implications of the results were discussed in relation to future practices to reduce homophobia and transphobia within society, and in turn, reduce minority stress and maintain a flourishing state of positive mental health among all LGBTQ members. en_US
dc.subject LGBTQ issues en_US
dc.subject Bullying en_US
dc.subject Positive Mental Health en_US
dc.subject Minority Stress Theory en_US
dc.title Does "it get better"?: childhood bullying and the positive mental health of LGBT Canadians in adulthood en_US
dc.degree.discipline Sociology en_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Cormier, Frank (Sociology) Ristock, Janice (Women's and Gender Studies) en_US
dc.degree.level Master of Arts (M.A.) en_US
dc.description.note October 2016 en_US


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