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Decreases in cerebral saturation in patients with septic shock are associated with increased risk of death: a prospective observational single center study

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dc.contributor.author Funk, Duane J
dc.contributor.author Kumar, Anand
dc.contributor.author Klar, Gregory
dc.date.accessioned 2016-07-04T14:10:24Z
dc.date.available 2016-07-04T14:10:24Z
dc.date.issued 2016-06-29
dc.identifier.citation Journal of Intensive Care. 2016 Jun 29;4(1):42
dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40560-016-0167-y
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/31512
dc.description.abstract Abstract Background The mortality rate from septic shock has been declining. Cerebral hypoxia, measured non-invasively with cerebral oximetry, has been correlated with neurologic and non-neurologic sequelae. Whether cerebral desaturations occur in septic shock patients and what consequences these may have is untested. Methods Adult patients with septic shock had cerebral saturation monitoring initiated. The primary objective was to determine if the incidence and magnitude of cerebral desaturations in septic shock patients correlated with delirium. We also compared the incidence and magnitude of cerebral desaturations in patients with septic shock with patients undergoing high-risk non-cardiac surgical procedures, a group known to be at high risk for cerebral desaturations. Results Fifteen patients were enrolled. Twelve (80 %) patients had a decrease in SctO2 below 65 %. Delirium was not associated with the area under the curve of an SctO2 of 65 % (p = 0.84). Patients who died of septic shock had more significant decreases in SctO2 than those who survived (p = 0.04). Decreased SctO2 was more common in patients with septic shock and was of greater magnitude than those undergoing high-risk non-cardiac surgery. Conclusions Cerebral desaturations occur more commonly and are of a greater magnitude in septic shock patients compared with those undergoing high-risk non-cardiac surgery. There did not appear to be a relationship between the incidence or magnitude of decreases in SctO2 and ICU delirium. Patients who died of septic shock had more significant decreases in SctO2 than patients who survived.
dc.rights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.title Decreases in cerebral saturation in patients with septic shock are associated with increased risk of death: a prospective observational single center study
dc.type Journal Article
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.language.rfc3066 en
dc.rights.holder The Author(s).
dc.date.updated 2016-06-29T16:02:38Z


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