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dc.contributor.supervisor Lin, Francis (Physics and Astronomy) Levin, David (Biosystems Engineering) en_US
dc.contributor.author Wu, Jiandong
dc.date.accessioned 2016-04-06T16:43:32Z
dc.date.available 2016-04-06T16:43:32Z
dc.date.issued 2013 en_US
dc.date.issued 2014 en_US
dc.date.issued 2015 en_US
dc.date.issued 2016 en_US
dc.identifier.citation J.D. Wu, X. Wu and F. Lin, “Recent developments in microfluidics-based chemotaxis studies". Lab on Chip. 2013, 13(13):2484-99. en_US
dc.identifier.citation J.D. Wu and F. Lin, “Recent developments in electrotaxis assays". Advances in Wound Care, 2014, 3(2):149-155. en_US
dc.identifier.citation J.D. Wu, L.P. Ouyang, N. Wadhawana, J. Li, M. Zhang, S. Liao, D. Levin and F. Lin, "A compact microfluidic system for cell migration studies", Biomedical Microdevices, 2014, 16(4): 521-528 en_US
dc.identifier.citation J.D. Wu, C. Hillier, P. Komenda, R. Lobato de Faria, D. Levin, M. Zhang and F. Lin, “A microfluidic platform for evaluating neutrophil chemotaxis induced by sputum from COPD patients”, PLoS ONE, 2015 May 11;10(5):e0126523. en_US
dc.identifier.citation J.D. Wu, C. Hillier, P. Komenda, R. Lobato de Faria, S. Santos, D. Levin, M. Zhang, F. Lin, “An all-on-chip method for testing neutrophil chemotaxis induced by fMLP and COPD patient’s sputum”, Technology, 2016, accepted. en_US
dc.identifier.citation J.D. Wu, L.P. Ouyang, M. Zhang, S. Liao, C. Hillier, P. Komenda, R.L. de Faria and F. Lin, “Assessing neutrophil chemotaxis in COPD using a compact microfluidic system”, The 36th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC’14), Chicago, U.S.A., August 26-30, 2014. en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/31179
dc.description.abstract Immune cell migration and chemotaxis plays a key role in immune response. Further research to study the mechanisms of immune cell migration and to develop clinical applications requires advanced experimental tools. Microfluidic devices can precisely apply chemical gradient signals to cells, which is advantageous in quantifying cell migratory response. However, most existing microfluidic systems are impractical to use without specialized facilities and research skills, which hinders their broad use in biological and medical research communities. In this thesis, we integrated several new developments in microfluidic gradient generating devices, compact imaging systems, on-chip cell isolation, cell patterning, and rapid data analysis, to provide an easy-to-use and practical solution for immune cell migration and chemotaxis experiments. Using these systems, we quantitatively studied neutrophil migration for both research and clinical applications. First, we developed a compact USB microscope-based Microfluidic Chemotaxis Analysis System (UMCAS), which integrates microfluidic devices, live cell imaging, environmental control, and data analysis to provide an inexpensive and compact solution for rapid microfluidic cell migration and chemotaxis experiments with real-time result reporting. To eliminate the lengthy cell preparation from large amounts of blood, we developed a simple all-on-chip method for magnetic isolation of untouched neutrophils directly from small volumes of blood, followed by chemotaxis testing on the same microfluidic device. Using these systems, we studied neutrophil migration in gradients of different chemoattractants, such as interleukin-8 (IL-8), N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP), and clinical sputum samples from Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) patients. Previous studies have shown that COPD is correlated with neutrophil infiltration into the airways through chemotactic migration. The thesis work is the first application of the microfluidic platform to quantitatively characterizing neutrophil chemotaxis to sputum samples from COPD patients. Our results show increased neutrophil chemotaxis to COPD sputum compared to control sputum from healthy individuals. The level of COPD sputum induced neutrophil chemotaxis was correlated with the patient’s spirometry data. Collectively, the research in this thesis provides novel microfluidic systems for neutrophil migration and chemotaxis analysis in both basic research and clinical applications. The developed microfluidic systems will find broad use in cell migration related applications. en_US
dc.publisher Royal Society of Chemistry en_US
dc.publisher Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. en_US
dc.publisher Springer en_US
dc.publisher Public Library of Science en_US
dc.publisher World Scientific Publishing en_US
dc.publisher IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC’14) en_US
dc.subject Microfluidics en_US
dc.subject Chemotaxis en_US
dc.subject Cell migration en_US
dc.subject COPD en_US
dc.subject Neutrophil en_US
dc.title Development of microfluidics-based neutrophil migration analysis systems for research and clinical applications en_US
dc.degree.discipline Biosystems Engineering en_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Morrison, Jason (Biosystems Engineering) Goertzen, Andrew (Radiology) Ren, Carolyn (University of Waterloo) en_US
dc.degree.level Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) en_US
dc.description.note May 2016 en_US


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