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dc.contributor.supervisor Friel, James (Human Nutritional Sciences) en_US
dc.contributor.author Priyantha, Wengappuliarachchi
dc.date.accessioned 2015-09-21T14:37:32Z
dc.date.available 2015-09-21T14:37:32Z
dc.date.issued Not applicable en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/30840
dc.description.abstract Background: Human breast milk is a primary source of bacteria for the infant gut. This study aims to develop bacterial DNA extraction methods to determine whether a relationship exists between breast milk and infant gut microbiota with respect to obesogenic bacteria. Study design: Total of 16 breast milk and respective infants fecal samples were collected to analyze. Methods: Fecal and breast milk bacterial DNA were analyzed to identify the strains up to genus level. Results: Fermicutes was high in breast milk from overweight women and their infant’s gut microbiota but Bacteroidetes increased only in infants’ gut microbiota of overweight women. However, there were no significant relationships between normal-weight and overweight women’ breast milk and between their respective infants’ gut microbiota. Conclusion: This pilot study has shown means that obesogenic bacteria may be introduced into infant gut through the breast milk. However, we were impossible to answer whole concept statistically. en_US
dc.rights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.subject Microbiota en_US
dc.title Infant gut microbiota changes during lactation and how it is shaped by human breast milk microbiota en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/masterThesis
dc.degree.discipline Human Nutritional Sciences en_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Khafipour, Ehsan (Animal Sciences) Eskin, Michael (Human Nutritional Sciences) Myrie, Semone (Human Nutritional Sciences) en_US
dc.degree.level Master of Science (M.Sc.) en_US
dc.description.note October 2015 en_US


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