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dc.contributor.supervisor McLachlan, Stephane (Environment & Geography) en_US
dc.contributor.author Martens, Tabitha Robin
dc.date.accessioned 2015-09-18T13:08:27Z
dc.date.available 2015-09-18T13:08:27Z
dc.date.issued 2015
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/30825
dc.description.abstract Food sovereignty has recently emerged as a means of addressing food-related problems that confront many Indigenous and rural communities around the world. It moves beyond access to food, and is grounded in the idea that people should self-determine their food systems and cultural traditions. This is particularly important for Indigenous people who still face threats to their food systems linked to colonialism. I explore Indigenous food sovereignty by examining 24 community-located food initiatives across western Canada. Outcomes were summarized using a circle metaphor describing four key elements of Indigenous food sovereignty: history, connection to the land, relationships and identity. A related Indigenous Food Gathering was also held, focusing on reflection, the importance of cultural identity to Indigenous food sovereignty and informing the thesis through a personal narrative. Moving forward requires a shift in how Indigenous food relationships are understood, incorporating Indigenous worldviews and perspectives as part of a larger resurgence movement. en_US
dc.subject Indigenous en_US
dc.title Good news in food: Understanding the value and promise of Indigenous food sovereignty in western Canada en_US
dc.degree.discipline Environment and Geography en_US
dc.contributor.examiningcommittee Baydack, Rick (Environment & Geography) Hart, Michael (Social Work) Cidro, Jaime (UW- Anthropology) en_US
dc.degree.level Master of Environment (M.Env.) en_US
dc.description.note October 2015 en_US


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