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dc.contributor.author Young, Christopher J. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2007-07-12T17:48:20Z
dc.date.available 2007-07-12T17:48:20Z
dc.date.issued 2001-09-12T00:00:00Z en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1993/2538
dc.description.abstract The theoretical foundations of the thesis are based on international regime theory, in particular the concept of security regimes. The thesis divides the debates between Europeanists and Atlanticists and places both within the theoretical constructs of international regime theory. Europeanists believe that the European Union must eventually develop and implement its own defence capabilities outside of NATO. The Europeanist argument relies on a more functionalist approach to international regimes, whereby integration in one area will necessarily spillover into the security realm. Atlanticists, on the other hand, believe that NATO must remain as the key institution to supply the public good of defence for Europe. The Atlanticist argument rely on the premise of hegemonic stability and the need to have a hegemon, the United States, remain as the leader within the regime in order to sustain the regime. (Abstract shortened by UMI.) en_US
dc.format.extent 14608920 bytes
dc.format.extent 184 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.format.mimetype text/plain
dc.language en en_US
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.rights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.title The European security and defence identity debate en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/masterThesis
dc.type master thesis en_US
dc.degree.discipline Political Studies en_US
dc.degree.level Master of Arts (M.A.) en_US


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